Riikka Hyvönen started working with the bruises – called ‘kisses’ by roller derby – through collecting photographs of roller derby girls’ butts. She then captured the athletes’ injuries in giant artworks. “I hope people will see the beauty of bruises,” Hyvönen says. Pop, kitsch, and perhaps even slightly camp in their glittery leather glory, the 3D objects, made by Hyvönen are somewhere between sculptures and paintings.

Riikka Hyvönen started working with the bruises – called ‘kisses’ by roller derby – through collecting photographs of roller derby girls’ butts. She then captured the athletes’ injuries in giant artworks. “I hope people will see the beauty of bruises,” Hyvönen says. Pop, kitsch, and perhaps even slightly camp in their glittery leather glory, the 3D objects, made by Hyvönen are somewhere between sculptures and paintings. “I painted the bums to capture momentary marks that are seen in a completely different light in the mainstream than inside the subculture of roller derby girls.” In roller derby, bruises can be seen as badges of honours. The bruises, usually referred as ’derby kisses’ are trophies, which are often photographed and posted online. ”I believe these images are charged with (mental) strength. They show that the player’s bodies can take the hits yet overcome the pain and still continue to play. ”

”Obviously, I am objectifying these women totally. But I am doing it exactly the way they objectify themselves: their big and strong bums are assets and to be carried with pride.” Hyvönen says. Hyvönen portrays the feminist, communal spirit as one of the essential characteristics of the sport. Even the titles of her works are inspired by the comments posted under the photos the girls have shared on Internet: "Oh Lord. Is That the One That Looks Suspiciously Like My Wheel?! God, I’m Sorry To Have Marked You So :( … Um, Think Of It As A Love Bite? xx"

via beautiful decay