On Sunday, March 8, 2015, MoMA will open a retrospective of the Icelandic-born artist, focusing on not only her identity as a visual artist, but the power of her music. Many people will be flooded with memories of listening to Björk’s amazing output from the ’90s...

On Sunday, March 8, 2015, The Museum of Modern Art will open a retrospective of the Icelandic-born artist, focusing on not only her identity as a visual artist, but the power of her music. Many people will be flooded with memories of listening to Björk’s amazing output from the ’90s, Debut, Post and Homogenic, her breakthrough performance in Lars Von Trier’s Dancer in the Dark, the forward-thinking app experience that accompanied her 2011 album Biophilia, or perhaps most importantly, the amazing videos with such directors as Spike Jonze, Chris Cunningham and recently Andrew Thomas Huang. All of these interludes and experiences with Björk were and are transformative; they take you somewhere. As the retrospective opens this Friday, Björk’s deeply personal new LP Vulnicura is fresh in our minds, and one of the most defining artists of her generation gets a much deserved, in-depth examination.

All photography by Bryan Derballa.

The exhibition at MoMA draws from more than 20 years of the artist’s daring and innovative projects and her eight full-length albums to chronicle her career through sound, film, visuals, instruments, objects, and costumes. In the Museum lobby, instruments used on Biophilia (2011)—a gameleste, pipe organ, gravity harp, and Tesla coil—play songs from the album at different points throughout the day. On the second floor, in the Marron Atrium, two spaces have been constructed: one is dedicated to a new sound and video installation, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, for “Black Lake,” a song from Björk’s new album Vulnicura (2015); and the second is a cinema room that screens a retrospective in music videos, from Debut (1993) to Biophilia. On the third floor, Songlines presents an interactive, location-based audio experience through Björk’s albums, with a biographical narrative that is both personal and poetic, written by the acclaimed Icelandic writer Sjón, along with many visuals, objects, and costumes, including the robots designed by Chris Cunningham for the “All Is Full of Love” music video, Marjan Pejowski’s Swan Dress (2001), and Iris van Herpen’s Biophilia tour dress (2013), among many others.

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Visit beyondthecover.juxtapoz.com for exlusive images, video and extended interviews with MoMA curator Klaus Biesenbach and director and collaborator Andrew Thomas Huang from our April issue.

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Our April, 2015 issue featuring Björk is on sale now. Subscribe and get it for free.


(Bjork cover photo by Stephane Sednaoui
)