The second album in David Bowie’s Berlin Trilogy, Heroes, stands as one of his most iconic and era-defining albums. The album was recorded in 1977 at West Berlin’s Hansa Tonstudio, located about a quarter-mile away from the Berlin Wall. Bowie experimented extensively with ambient and electronic music throughout his time in Berlin with co-producers Tony Visconti and Brian Eno, as well as guitar contributions from King Crimson’s Robert Fripp.

Juxtapoz Sound and Vision is a new segment on our platform dedicated to exploring one piece of substantial album artwork every Sunday. Album artwork is one of the primary ways that musicians and visual artists are able to collaborate, and many iconic album covers are simultaneously iconic pieces of pop art. It’s also an excuse for us to share some of our favorite albums and the visual component behind what makes an album groundbreaking and fun.

September 14, 2018: David Bowie’s “Heroes”
Cover photo by Masayoshi Sukita
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The second album in David Bowie’s Berlin Trilogy, Heroes, stands as one of his most iconic and era-defining albums. The album was recorded in 1977 at West Berlin’s Hansa Tonstudio, located about a quarter-mile away from the Berlin Wall. Bowie experimented extensively with ambient and electronic music throughout his time in Berlin with co-producers Tony Visconti and Brian Eno, as well as guitar contributions from King Crimson’s Robert Fripp.

The cover photo was shot by Masayoshi Sukita, and is a reference to Erich Heckel’s painting Roquairol. Sukita also shot the cover photo for Iggy Pop’s The Idiot, which was recorded in the same time period. In an interview with NME in 1977, Bowie clarified that his inclusion of the word “heroes” in quotations marks was meant to "indicate a dimension of irony about the word 'heroes' or about the whole concept of heroism."

Here's a video from 1978 of Bowie performing the title track at London's Earls Court.