Hip-Hop Revolution presents more than 80 photographs taken between 1977 and 1990 by three preeminent New York-based photographers—Janette Beckman, Joe Conzo, and Martha Cooper—who documented hip hop from its pioneering days through its emergence into mainstream popular culture. Contributor Joe Russo documented the opening of the show a few weeks ago!


Hip-hop culture, incorporating such elements as DJing, rapping, and breaking (dancing), was born on the streets of New York City in the 1970s and grew to have a global impact on music, dance, and fashion. The exhibition showcases the experiences of each photographer during these seminal years, as DJs, MCs, and b-boys (breakdancers) were continually innovating, developing new forms of self-expression. The work of these photographers—featuring early figures Afrika Bambaata, Kool Herc, and Cold Crush Brothers, breakers (or b-boys) like Rock Steady Crew, and breakout acts such as Run DMC and the Beastie Boys—form a broad survey of a movement that is indelibly linked to New York City and still has a resounding influence today.

The show will be up at the Museum of the City of New York through September 13, 2015.