Control is lost and time becomes an abstraction when Mike Aho draws us into the short film The Lonely Life, which he wrote, directed and scored. He can be credited with almost every aspect of the film. (That, on top of being the new creative director at Volcom, and leading the band ((sounder)).) It stars musician and actor Will Oldham, whose character had been cryogenically frozen and is searching to understand his former life. Dazed in the intense haze of medication, lies and hallucinations, the film follows this search for truth amidst a cloak of certain evil. 

This is an exclusive screening of  The Lonely Life, it will only be viewable for a limited time.

Control is lost and time becomes an abstraction when Mike Aho draws us into the short film The Lonely Life, which he wrote, directed and scored. He can be credited with almost every aspect of the film. (That, on top of being the new creative director at Volcom, and leading the band ((sounder)).) It stars musician and actor Will Oldham, whose character had been cryogenically frozen and is searching to understand his former life. Dazed in the intense haze of medication, lies and hallucinations, the film follows this search for truth amidst a cloak of certain evil. 

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Mel Kadel:  Michael Sieben, Travis Millard and Jeremy Fish contributed the art in the film. What was your intent when bringing in animated elements?
Mike Aho: I wanted to bring friends into the project as visual artists and not give them much context around the world they were creating. The idea, within the film, is that David is hallucinating these visions, so the randomness of imagery and disconnect between the artist and the scene
helped create a surreal world, hopefully.

The intensity of the film revolves around a lot of heavy issues. How was the mood on set?
I assembled a rag tag team of friends all donating their time and helping out with whatever they could, so it was pretty fun, actually. It wasn't until we shot the scene that reveals the scar around David’s neck that I felt the weight of what we were doing, or trying to do.

There is a constant blurring of reality throughout the film. I’m curious if this was all in the script, or if you and Will improvised at all during the shoot?
Will improvised some really clever things that added so much, like pedaling the bike backwards and things like that, but most of it was scripted. There were actually a couple more scenes that I cut because I felt like it wasn't keeping the viewer grounded in reality.  

Read the full interview in the April, 2015 issue of Juxtapoz Magazine, on sale now. 

You can buy the new ((sounder)) album, The Howlingest Call, which features most of the soundtrack and includes a free digital download of the film, through Monofonus Press. For more information about Mike Aho, visit mikeahoart.com