Bizarre Porcelain Sculptures by Jason Briggs

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, June 30, 2015
Jason Briggs lives in rural Tennessee where he teaches part time in Nashville and spends the rest of the time in his studio creating these bizarre porcelain sculptures. Through his work, Jason is searching for a fresh perspective and trying to create objects that he's never quite seen before and "whose inherent mystery and intrigue quietly insists upon viewer interaction." In his words, "Obvious sexual references, along with an extravagant, fetish-like attention to surface, can arouse a yearning to touch as powerful as the act itself."

“Perceptual Shift" by Michael Murphy

Juxtapoz // Friday, June 26, 2015
“Perceptual Shift” is a 3D halftone sculpture using 1,252 wood balls, paint, and braided fibers to create, according to the view of the observer, an eye sculpture. Michael Murphy, an American sculptor, is know for his multidimensional work.

Ben Butler's Unbounded Installation at Rice Gallery

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Ben Butler's latest installation, Unbounded, is a light, meticulously-constructed sculpture made from around 10,000 hand-cut poplar sticks—a stylistic departure from the dense wood pieces we posted about in 2013. The piece is currently up in the Rice Gallery at Rice University in Houston. Butler chose poplar for its low-cost, malleability, and abundance. 

Adam Nathaniel Furman's Sculptures Emerging from a Fictional Shut-in

Design // Wednesday, June 24, 2015
In 2014, Adam Nathaniel Furman entered a three-month long residency with the London Design Museum. For the duration, he isolated himself in his studio and, guided by the residency's theme of identity, worked as a fictional character on his 3-D printed designs. 

Crystal Wagner's Trash-and-Chicken-Wire Sculptures at Viacom

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, June 24, 2015
We've covered Crystal Wagner's work before, and are thrilled to see images of her new installation at Viacom—Wild Efflux 2015. She's still creating bright, twisted sculptures with birthday party tablecloths woven through a chicken-wire structures. 

Liz Hickok's Groundwater Series

Photography // Thursday, June 18, 2015
Liz Hickok's latest series, Ground Waters, is created by flooding miniature scenes of urban decay with liquid crystal solutions. The solutions crystallize on the structures, creating an etherial scene that defies typical proportions. 

Incredible Ceramic Sculptures by Johnson Tsang

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, June 10, 2015
This isn't the first time we've posted the ceramic work of Johnson Tsang and it probably won't be the last! We recently ventured to his website to find endless process photos behind some of the more impressive works we have seen floating around the web. We've put together some of our favorites for you to enjoy! For more you'll just have to visit his website... 

June Lee's Bystander

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, June 09, 2015
Korean artist June Lee's work is based on the social phenomena of the bystander, what she calls the "Bystander Effect." "Countless things Countless things that happen quietly in our society are cases of bystander effect that make select individuals into outcasts. Thinking how I can become a social outcast due to the distant indifferent bystanders, I find this a serious problem that can’t be overlooked in silence.

"Intimate Vestiges" by Fiona Roberts

Juxtapoz // Friday, June 05, 2015
Dealing with questions like what is human and where are memories, the sculpture installation Intimate Vestiges by Fiona Roberts transforms the mundane into psychedelic poetry. A rug of fingers, faces in pillows and mouths on chairs, these anthropomorphized objects allow viewers to rethink what just is and what is taken for granted.

The Stunning Hyperrealistic Sculptures of the Late Duane Hanson @ Serpentine, London

Juxtapoz // Monday, June 01, 2015
Definitely something to check out if you are one of our London readers or about to take a trip there: The Serpentine presents the work of late American sculptor Duane Hanson (1925-1996) in his first survey show in London since 1997. Throughout his forty-year career, Hanson created lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society. Reminiscent of the Pop Art movement of the time, his sculptures transform the banalities and trivialities of everyday life into iconographic material. The exhibition at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery presents key works from the artist’s oeuvre. 


Full magazine features from Juxtapoz

visit the VAULT >