Portraits Made From Food, Plants and other Organics by Klaus Enrique

Juxtapoz // Friday, October 18, 2013
Based on Giuseppe Arcimboldo's 400-year-old paintings, New York-based artist Klaus Enrique constructs figures out of plants and food. "Although most reconginze the images immediately as portraits, there are many people who do not. At first they only see the individual parts of the image: the fruits, flowers, and vegetables...simple organic objects come together to create something more meaningful than the sum of its parts."

Sculptures by Zhang Huan

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, October 15, 2013
Chinese artist Zhang Huan has become well known for his performance art as well as his sculptural works. This morning we take a look through a collection of some of his sculptures including this 2011 piece titled Q Confucius No.2, a 'massive silica-gel, mechanical bust of an unclothed Confucius rests in a rectangular pool.' The sculpture's breast rises and falls as if the object were breathing!

Tree Trunks Made from Stacked Newspapers

Juxtapoz // Monday, October 14, 2013
Columbian artist Miler Lagos has stacked newspaper clippings, tightly packing them together and then carving and sanding them into tree trunk shape, finally painting them a wooden color. The method and sculptures remind us of Lee Hongbo's flexible paper skull.

Fabric Sculptures by Do Ho Suh

Juxtapoz // Monday, October 14, 2013
Korean artist Do Ho Suh has been on this site before with various and often a diverse range of fantastic sculptures. For an upcoming exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, the artist has created sculptures of common household items out of polyester fabric.  

The Work of Angelika Arendt

Juxtapoz // Thursday, October 10, 2013
This morning we take a look at the work of talented Berlin-based artist Angelika Arendt. Arendt creates both intricate ink drawings and sculptures and installations made from painted polyurethane.

Wooden Sculptures and Drawings by Ben Butler

Juxtapoz // Thursday, October 10, 2013
We are enjoying the rhythmic sculptures and drawings of Memphis-based artist Ben Butler this morning. Butler is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College and his work has been shown in galleries across the United States.

Wooden Shark Coffins by Handsome Wong

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, October 09, 2013
A clever social awareness campaign from Handsome Wong of Y&R Shanghai: A shark-sized coffin with protruding fins! The campaign is meant to emphasize the mass killings of sharks. Over 73 million of the species are killed every year for soup. Their fins (which only make up 2% of their total weight) are brutally sliced off and the rest is tossed back into the ocean. 

Update: Quilled Paper Sculptures by Lisa Nilsson

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, October 09, 2013
Lisa Nilsson constructed these incredible anatomical sculptures using a technique called quilling or paper filigree. By rolling and shaping narrow strips of Japanese mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books, the artist has created "densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section." Update: She will be opening a new exhibition at Pavel Zoubok Gallery in NYC this Thursday, October 10th, 2013.

3-Ton Aerical Mosaic of Johanessburg by Gerhard Marx

Juxtapoz // Friday, October 04, 2013
From a distance this enormous sculpture appears to be an aerial photograph blown up and mounted. However, as you look closer you will find that it is a huge mosaic made from natural stone, red brick, ceramic elements and glass! The 56-panel sculpture weights almost three tons and was created by artist Gerhard Marx and Spier Architectural Arts for the 2013 FNB Joburg Art Fair.

Sculptures by AJ Fosik

Juxtapoz // Thursday, October 03, 2013
Using locally sourced lumber grown in Oregon, AJ Fosik creates his signature and ever evolving sculptural work. The wonderful figures and anthropomorphized fantastical creatures are built using a complex process involving arranging hundreds of pieces of individually cut and varnished woods which are then painted vibrant colors and patterns.

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