Neil Dawson’s Suspended Sculptures

Juxtapoz // Friday, August 08, 2014
Neil Dawson’s sculptures trick the eye and mesmerize anyone who comes in contact with it. His designs of shapes and forms are cleverly suspended by wires, creating illusions and compositions that hold infinite dimensions. As you scale the sculptures, the realization that the negative space is part of the entire piece, becomes increasingly apparent. Whether placed in nature or urban environments, these pieces are whimsical and encapsulate a feeling of monumental achievement. 

Thrift Store Sculptures by Sayaka Ganz

Juxtapoz // Thursday, August 07, 2014
Artist Sayaka Ganz creates her sculptures using thrift store plastics. Both her Japanese roots and the Japanese Shinto belief that ‘all objects and organisms have spirits’ heavily influence Sayaka. With those as her starting point, she feels that art arise 'from the passion for fitting odd shapes together and a sympathy toward discarded objects.'

Marc Giai-Miniet's Miniature Boxes

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, August 06, 2014
French artist Marc Giai-Miniet constructs his intricate 'Boxes,' placing small characters and grim scenes inside the empty spaces where unknown events have taken place. The miniature libraries, fictional attics, laboratories, storage rooms and interrogation cells are filled mostly with books and unknown experiments.

Ceramic Sculptures by Beth Cavener Stichter

Juxtapoz // Monday, August 04, 2014
There are primitive animal instincts lurking in our own depths, waiting for the chance to slide past a conscious moment. The sculptures I create focus on human psychology, stripped of context and rationalization, and articulated through animal and human forms. On the surface, these figures are simply feral and domestic individuals suspended in a moment of tension...

Angela Palmer's 3D Glass Sculptures

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 31, 2014
The details in Angela Palmer's glass sculptures are taken from MRI and CT scans. They are engraved onto sheets of glass before being layered on top of one another to recreate the human form. Once the final piece has been assembled, we see a 3D image of the brain that can only be seen from the front or back.

New Ceramic Work By Sergei Isupov

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 30, 2014
We are really enjoying the new work of Sergei Isupov,a ceramic artist born in Russia and currently living in Virginia. From a family of artists–his mother, Nelli Isupova, is a ceramics folk artist and his father, Vladimir Isupov, and younger brother, Ilya Isupov, are painters.

Olafur Eliasson's The New Planet Installation

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Olafur Eliasson's "The New Planet" is constructed in the shape of an oloid, a geometric form discovered in 1924 by scientist Paul Schatz; the shape’s form is conceived around two congruent circles, placed perpendicular to one another with the centre of each lying on the circumference of the other. Very cool.

Cai Guo-qiang: The Ninth Wave

Juxtapoz // Saturday, July 26, 2014
Cai Guo Qiang is opening a show through The Power Station of Art in Shanghai, titled The Ninth Wave from August 8th to October 26th. A monumental and impactful installation of a fishing boat from the artist’s hometown of Quanzhou carrying 99 fabricated animals down the Huangpu River. Tigers, pandas, camels and apes cover the tiers of the worn ship, appearing weathered and dreary as hunched figures in fatigue. Guo Qiang took visual inspiration from Russian painter Ivan Aivazovsky’s 1850 painting, which illustrates survivors of a terrible shipwreck, hanging on for dear life with overt expressions of weary souls who battled the woes of nature and its unforgiveable forces, blatantly communicating human helplessness in the wake of mother earth’s blows.

Takayuki Ogawa's 3D Oral Alphabet

Juxtapoz // Friday, July 25, 2014
Horrific, eerie, frightening, and strange Takayuki Ogawa freezes the alphabet in time with oral expressions as three dimensional clay moldings. Oral:phabet is grotesquely and disturbingly realistic displaying mouths, teeth, lips, and tongues but revolving around the portrayal of each letter uniquely. Ogawa designed the English alphabet with inspiration from emotions, as was the motivation for his graduating thesis from Tama Art University. 

Wire Sculptures by Robin Wight

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 23, 2014
One of the most magical elements to the creative process is being able to conceptualize your imagination. Robin Wight does a spectacular job capturing this in his Fantasy Wire sculptures. Depicting a struggle between fairy and dandelion, the ironic scenario of such a delicate and fragile plant against a magical creature is beautiful to behold. Done with superb craftsmanship and displayed in its rightful natural environment, Wight creates dazzling masterpieces that are blissful to enjoy.

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