The Body and Soul of Choi Xooang

Juxtapoz // Monday, September 14, 2015
South Korean artist Choi Xooang shows us the realism of the human emotion frozen in an instant. The flow of life through polymer clay figures breathes the difficult reality we face today if Man does not confront the outer world. Choi personifies what he feels inside canalized by every emotion in a multidimensional way. He works through the whole body or a part, focusing on the intensity of sensation as he crystallizes life filled with so much severity and darkness....

Short Film About Sculptor Beth Cavener

Juxtapoz // Friday, September 11, 2015
The sculptures Beth Cavener creates focus on human psychology, stripped of context and rationalization, and articulated through animal and human forms. Cavener wants to pry at those uncomfortable, awkward edges between animal and human. Entangled in their own internal and external struggles, the figures express frustration for the human tendency towards cruelty and lack of understanding. Something conscious and knowing is captured in their gestures and expressions.

"Content Void Content" and "Haywire" at Catherine Clark Gallery

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, September 09, 2015
On September 12th, the Catherine Clark Gallery is opening two simultaneous exhibitions of work—Content Void Content and Haywire. Content Void Content includes mirrored sculptures by Andy Diaz Hope “which combine ancient mathematics, traditional craft, and modern technology to explore unlikely sources of transcendence.” Haywire is an exhibition of paintings by Kara Maria “which blend abstract and representational traditions in a visual dialogue about the bizarre, precarious, and yet alluring state of our environment.”

Paper Sculptures of Weapons by Li Hongbo

Juxtapoz // Friday, September 04, 2015
Beijing-based artist L Hongbo is well known for his evocative static paper and glue sculptures. We’ve talked before about his busts, made up of about 8,000 sheets of paper glued manually in a honeycomb structure and here he is again with another show that’s just as impressive. Irons for the Ages, Flowers for the Day is a large-scale installation on display at the SCAD Museum of Art. Covering the entire gallery, Hongbo’s work will be up until January 24th, 2016.

Benjamin Shine's Fabric Sculpture Installations

Juxtapoz // Thursday, September 03, 2015
Artist Benjamin Shine's latest installation in Canberra, Australia are composed of more than 2000 meters of tulle fabric. "I began playing around with the idea of dancers because it was something I'd been working on, and I wanted to use the tulle because it links to dance and ballet," he told the Canberra Times. "And it's the first time they've been suspended from the ceiling as three-dimensional pieces that are like sculptures, and it's the first time I've used lighting to back light them so it's entirely new territory."

New Work by Derek Weisberg

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, September 01, 2015
Derek Weisberg just finished the Gallagher/Perry residency for ceramics in Oakland, CA in July. Weisberg, currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY but returned to the soil which he cut his teeth on for a month to make a beautiful new series of works; both sculptures in the round and wall sculptures. This new work is an investigation and combination of figuration and abstraction, presence and absence, structure and decay, life and death. 

Sand "Castles" Like You've Never Seen

Juxtapoz // Friday, August 28, 2015
Matthew Kaliner, a Harvard University lecturer uses the "drip method" that we all learned as kids on the beach to create otherworldly sculptures on the beach. In an interview with The Atlantic, Kaliner says that he is "motivated entirely by the sheer joy of playing on the beach, and making something out of what I can find that day." Although he enjoys watching the castles get swept away, Kaliner aims "to make make my castles more resilient to waves by using sticks, anchored by elaborate braces I dig underground," the sand architect explained. "Watching the castle rising above the waves is a real treat—and that's always when they look best.”

Series and Systems by Keith Tyson

Juxtapoz // Thursday, August 27, 2015
Keith Tyson began working as an apprentice engineer making nuclear submarines after leaving high school at age 15. Deciding to pursue art, he quit the shipyards and gained admission to the Carlisle College of Art, England, graduating in 1990. He earned his M.A. in Alternative Practice at the University of Brighton, England in 1993.

The Art of Watermelon Carving

Juxtapoz // Monday, August 24, 2015
You don't want to be like everyone else this Halloween, with a Pumpkin face sitting on your doorstep. Are you looking to venture beyond sqaush? Well, look no further than the Melon! Creative fruit carvers from around the world have put their carving skills to work on Watermelons of all shapes and sizes. It turns out, their red insides can be just as frightening...

Stellar: Baptiste Debombourg's 1,000 Chair Installation

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, August 11, 2015
Patience is a virtue. According to Beautiful/Decay, it took "Baptiste Debombourg 1200 chairs, 300 meters of steel tubes and 11 months to set up the installation in the middle of plaza du Bouffay in Nantes, France." Situated in a plaza with multiple coffee shops and cafes, the chairs represent a communal effect, and each cafe gets a unique vantage point of the sculpture. 


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