Best of 2013: Hyperrealistic Animals Made From Painted Layers of Resin

Juxtapoz // Monday, December 30, 2013
Originally published on November 4th, 2013: Singapore-based artist Keng Lye is back with some new resin paingings. By meticulously painting layers of epoxy resin with acrylics, Lye produces works of art that float somewhere between painting and sculpture. Each piece can consist of patiently executed layers which are necessary to create the sense of depth they have. The series is titled Alive Without Breath.

New Book Carvings From Guy Laramée

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, December 24, 2013
Throughout the last year we have posted many different artists who have been using old books as a medium for their art. By carving, slicing, gluing, stacking, and collaging the pages and spines of books, the artists have been creating incredible works of art from otherwise discarded and forgotten about printed materials. One of these artists, Guy Laramée, recently took a 24-volume set of the now discontinued Encyclopedia Britannica and transformed it into a mountain range. The piece, titled Adieu, is inspired by the announcement that the company would cease printing of the book sets.

Best of 2013: Sculptures by Jonty Hurwitz

Juxtapoz // Thursday, December 19, 2013
Originally published on February 1st. 2013:  It may be a tad hard to see what is going on here, but look closely. Artist/scientist Jonty Hurwitz creates what appear to be ordinary abstract sculptures, but when viewed in a cylinder, reflective surface, the sculpture takes on the appearence of a figurative shape. Hurwtiz won the 2009 Noble Sculpture Prize.

Best of 2013: Meticulously Constructed Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki

Juxtapoz // Thursday, December 19, 2013
Originally published on February 26th, 2013: From delicately carving rolls of tape into detailed landscapes to building towers out of loose towel threads and constructing intricate structures out of toothbrush bristles, Japanese artist Takahiro Iwasaki takes everyday objects and transforms them into amazing sculptures.

Giant Slugs Made from 40,000 Plastic Bags by Florentijn Hofman

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, December 18, 2013
Using 40,000 plastic bags, Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman built these two huge slugs that wove their way up the city steps in Angers, France. The two moving sculptures were titled "Slow Slugs."

Sculptures by Roger Reutimann

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, December 18, 2013
This morning we feature the sculptural work of Boulder, Colorado-based artist Roger Reutimann. Raised in Switzerland, in his teens Reutimann was first recognized as a classically trained concert pianist before training as a sculptor and artist in Zurich. Believing art lets him communicate an idea on 'a deeper, emotional level,' his influences are drawn from social issues and cultural scrutiny.

Sculptures by Ishibashi Yui

Juxtapoz // Monday, December 16, 2013
Tokyo-based artist Ishibashi Yui's sculptures are unsettling and beautiful. Her figures seem to have submitted to the plants and branches protruding and growing from their bodies, as if they have accepted their fate and are not sure if they even have the ability to fight or prevent the inevitable.

PVC Pipe Sculptures by Kang Duck-Bong

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, December 04, 2013
Korean artist Kang Duck-Bong creates these great and playful sculptures from PVC pipes. The works give a sense of motion, with multi-colors combining to create a unique blur effect.

Kollektiv Plus Zwei's Sculptures Look Like Giant Candy

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, December 03, 2013
Stefanie Högl and Matthias Borowski are kollektiv plus zwei. For the project, "The Importance of the Obvious," they have chosen to look at the dormant potential of materials and how they could be put to use. "First I've taken a close look at food, which, although itself a material, requires entirely different and often unique or experimental preparation methods...Attracted by the material characteristics of candies, I translated their colours, textures, layering, and expressions into designs."

Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin Levin's Gingerbread Architecture

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, December 03, 2013
Re-creating museums such as the Guggenheim, The Louvre, and the Tate Modern, artist Henry Hargreaves and stylist Caitlin Levin carefully baked, glued, cooked, carved, assembled (and hopefully eventually get to eat) these detailed gingerbread "houses!" The candy buildings will be on display at Dylan's Candy Bar at Art Basel this year.

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