Nick Cave's Soundsuits

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, November 26, 2013
American fabric sculptor, dancer, and performance artist Nick Cave is best known for his incredible Soundsuits: wearable fabric sculptures that are bright, whimsical, and other-worldly. Using everything from twigs and human hair to plastic, beads, and feathers, many of the suits resemble African ceremonial costumes and masks. Chicago-based, Cave is currently the director of the graduate fashion program at School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Sculptures by Bruno Catalano

Juxtapoz // Monday, November 25, 2013
Bruno Catalano is a French artist whose sculptures are often missing pieces. The human figures are travelers heading towards unknown destination, lacking important pieces but still standing. It's as if someone took the Photoshop "eraser" tool to them! Mr. Catalano was born in Morocco and a lifetime as a sailor inspired him to make these intriguing sculptural works.

AJ Fosik "Against the Infinite" @ Jonathan LeVine Gallery, NYC

Juxtapoz // Friday, November 22, 2013
Once again, AJ Fosik's work just looks stunning and some of the most original fine art sculptures made today. Against the Infinite marks the third solo show at Jonathan LeVine Gallery for the Portland, Oregon based artist, and as the gallery notes, the new work explores themes of "mortality and invention with imagery such as skulls, exposed ribcages, tools and weaponry including sickles, swords, hammers and stakes."

Edouard Martinet's Insect Sculptures

Juxtapoz // Thursday, November 21, 2013
Part of a car, bicycle, umbrella, compass, typewriter, clock, compass, the list of materials that French artist Edouard Martinet uses to construct his insect sculptures is as random at varied as it gets. The artist does not solder or weld parts but assembles them with the precision of a watchmaker, screwing them together and taking around a month per sculpture. His first took him four weeks and 17 years for his most recent!

Bizarre, Fleshy Sculptures by Francesco Albano

Juxtapoz // Thursday, November 21, 2013
We're not sure what type of creature these piles of sagging, deformed, empty skin belonged to but we sure don't want to meet them. Reminding us slightly of certain Asger Carlsen photos, these sculptures by Francesco Albano are certainly disturbing. Albano sees the skin as the nearest boundary between internal and external identity, a kind of storage space, and "bone" as a stable structure that sustains our physical presence and makes us complete.

David McCracken's Never-Ending Staircase

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, November 20, 2013
This seemingly never-ending staircase titled Diminish and Ascend is the work of artist David McCracken. Part of Bondi, Australia's annual Sculpture by the Sea event, the installation is an optical illusion that plays with perspectives and from certain angles appears to continue endlessly into the clouds! 

Curved Revs Sculpture

Street Art // Tuesday, November 19, 2013
You may or may not have seen this Revs metal sculpture before. From the photo it looks as if it is in someone’s backyard, unsecured. There is most likely an interesting story behind this piece.

Zheng Chunhui and the World's Longest Wooden Sculpture

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, November 19, 2013
Measuring approximately 40 feet long (12.3 meters), this incredible and massive wooden sculpture was carved from a single log! Based on the famous Chinese painting "Along the River During the Quingming Festival," the painstakingly detailed carving took four years and recently was declared the longest continuous wooden sculpture by Guinness World Records.

Incredible Ceramic Sculptures by Johnson Tsang

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, November 19, 2013
This isn't the first time we've posted the ceramic work of Johnson Tsang and it probably won't be the last! We recently ventured to his website to find endless process photos behind some of the more impressive works we have seen floating around the web. We've put together some of our favorites for you to enjoy! For more you'll just have to visit his website... 

Auto Aerobics and other Digital Art by Chris Labrooy

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, November 19, 2013
We love this series of digital sculptures by Chris Labrooy titled "Auto Aerobics." Chris has exhibited at the design museum in London and been featured in various publications, exploring CGI as a creative medium in itself which he could subvert and twist familiar everyday things into new typographic and sculptural form. He is interested in the intersection between typography, architecture, product design and visual art.

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