The Work of Uttaporn Nimmalaikaew

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, January 27, 2015
Each piece from Thai artist Uttaporn Nimmalaikaew "starts from a canvas backdrop that is set inside a deep casement, and that is then lightly veiled by multiple layers of thread and netting. The artist paints not only on the canvas but also on the thread and netting in order to create shimmering portraits and figurative scenes. He creates a depth of field that goes beyond three-dimensional space; rather, his work captures a time-space dimension in a way that has few parallels in the history of art. 

Duane Hanson's Masterful Photoreal Sculptures

Juxtapoz // Monday, January 26, 2015
If you're unfamiliar with Duane Hanson's photorealistic sculptures of everday people, check these out. With friends like these, who needs real people?

Process: The Sculptures of Yoshitoshi Kanemaki

Juxtapoz // Friday, January 23, 2015
We've shown you the work of Japanese sculptor and woodworker Yoshitoshi Kanemaki before. We checked back in recently and found that she has shared some photos of her process, from giant trunk of tree to girl with 12 heads... enjoy.

Suits of Armor for Your Cats

Juxtapoz // Friday, January 23, 2015
Jeff de Boer is a Calgary-based multi-media artist with an international reputation for producing some of the world's most original and well-crafted works of art. With an emphasis on metal, he is best known for such bodies of work as suits of armour for cats and mice, armour ties and sword-handled briefcases, rocket lamps and pop culture ray guns, and exquisite high art, abstract works called exoforms.

Scott Carter Creates Sculptures Using Gallery Walls

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, January 21, 2015
Scott Carter creates immersive installations that includes numerous sculptural and two-dimensional pieces using only the materials that are encompassed within - and sourced from - the gallery infrastructure itself. Carter's artistic practice encompasses a wide artistic discourse, including art, design, architecture, and even sound, but always relate to the nature of space and its relationship to the individual

Azuma Makoto's "Frozen Flowers"

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, January 20, 2015
Tokyo-based florist-artist Azuma Makoto, who previous project included lifting a 50 year old Bonzai into space, has created an exhibition that observes the changing life of flowers than have been frozen in water. With a wide assortment of plants, Makoto places the frozen blocks in different environments. As the ice begins to melt the flower blossoms will change shape and a glowing effect takes place. 

Fibonacci Zoetrope Sculptures

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, January 20, 2015
These are 3-D printed sculptures designed to animate when spun under a strobe light. The placement of the appendages is determined by the same method nature uses in pinecones and sunflowers. The rotation speed is synchronized to the strobe so that one flash occurs every time the sculpture turns 137.5º—the golden angle. If you count the number of spirals on any of these sculptures you will find that they are always Fibonacci numbers.

“Bound and Unbound,” Sculptures by Judith Scott @ the Brooklyn Museum

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, January 14, 2015
Judith Scott was an artist who was part of the Creative Growth Art Community in the San Francisco Bay Area, and her mixed media fiber sculptures are a wild and tangled thing of beauty. Don’t miss the current exhibition of her compelling sculptural work on view at The Brooklyn Museum through March 29, 2015. 

Marie-Lou Desmeules Turns People Into Sculptures

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, January 13, 2015
Leave it to Todd Oldham to introduce us to the strangest sculptures we’ve seen this year. Artist Marie-Lou Desmeules covers real humans in plastic and paint to create a living, grotesque but mesmerizing sculptures of well known figures, including celebrities and world leaders. Using a human armature is pretty a smart way to bring new “life” to your artwork, don’t you think?

Rebecca Szeto's Paintbrush Portraits

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, January 06, 2015
Rebecca Szeto's Paintbrush Portraits play with notions of re-forming beauty and value, offering a critique on consumerism, women's work, and a curious entanglement of class dynamics in Leisure & Labor - Trash & Treasure. She uses humble, end-of-life, mass-produced materials inspired by her experience as a faux finisher and initially by Velázquez's 17th century painting, Las Meninas. The paintbrush is self-referential, acting as both subject and object. It refers to the history of painting, through the medium of paint, using its own tool.


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