Sand "Castles" Like You've Never Seen

Juxtapoz // Friday, August 28, 2015
Matthew Kaliner, a Harvard University lecturer uses the "drip method" that we all learned as kids on the beach to create otherworldly sculptures on the beach. In an interview with The Atlantic, Kaliner says that he is "motivated entirely by the sheer joy of playing on the beach, and making something out of what I can find that day." Although he enjoys watching the castles get swept away, Kaliner aims "to make make my castles more resilient to waves by using sticks, anchored by elaborate braces I dig underground," the sand architect explained. "Watching the castle rising above the waves is a real treat—and that's always when they look best.”

Series and Systems by Keith Tyson

Juxtapoz // Thursday, August 27, 2015
Keith Tyson began working as an apprentice engineer making nuclear submarines after leaving high school at age 15. Deciding to pursue art, he quit the shipyards and gained admission to the Carlisle College of Art, England, graduating in 1990. He earned his M.A. in Alternative Practice at the University of Brighton, England in 1993.

The Art of Watermelon Carving

Juxtapoz // Monday, August 24, 2015
You don't want to be like everyone else this Halloween, with a Pumpkin face sitting on your doorstep. Are you looking to venture beyond sqaush? Well, look no further than the Melon! Creative fruit carvers from around the world have put their carving skills to work on Watermelons of all shapes and sizes. It turns out, their red insides can be just as frightening...

Stellar: Baptiste Debombourg's 1,000 Chair Installation

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, August 11, 2015
Patience is a virtue. According to Beautiful/Decay, it took "Baptiste Debombourg 1200 chairs, 300 meters of steel tubes and 11 months to set up the installation in the middle of plaza du Bouffay in Nantes, France." Situated in a plaza with multiple coffee shops and cafes, the chairs represent a communal effect, and each cafe gets a unique vantage point of the sculpture. 

Carol Milne Knits with Glass

Juxtapoz // Monday, August 10, 2015
Carol Milne, a Seattle-based artist, created a technique in 2006 that involves aspects of knitting, lost-wax casting, mold-making, and kiln-casting which allows her to create these beautiful glass sculptures that look close to impossible.

New Work by Cao Hui

Juxtapoz // Friday, August 07, 2015
Some might not be able to digest what Cao Hui is creating, but we are all about it. The artist’s newest series Visual Temperature explores the guts of everyday objects such as an armchair, suitcase and jacket.

A Hyperreal Fallen Angel Sculpture

Juxtapoz // Monday, August 03, 2015
Chinese artists Sun Yuan and Peng Yu have created a hyperreal sculpture of a fallen angel using fiberglass, woven mesh, and stainless steel. Initially constructed in 2008, the piece was installed in Beijing earlier last week. The duo previously has been featured on the site for their impressive hyperreal sculpture installations and have made headlines for using controversial materials like human fat tisue and real cadavers in their work.

A Giant Sculptural Steel Labryinth

Design // Monday, July 27, 2015
Well, this is one of the coolest mazes we've ever seen. Belgian studio Gijs Van Vaerenbergh, a collaborative team of Belgian architects and artists, has designed and constructed a massive labyrinth in the central square of a former coal mine in Genk, Belgium. The sculpture uses 186 tons of steel and consists of a kilometer maze of corridors with walls as high as 5 meters. 

Sculptures by Takeshi Haguri

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, July 21, 2015
Takeshi Haguri was born 1957 in Nagoya, Japan. After graduating the Sculpture course at the Aichi University of the Arts in 1982, he moved on to a postgraduate course, graduating in 1984. Since then he has been sculpting in wood mainly, using aluminium for outdoor works.

The Psychedelic Marbles of Mike Gong

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 16, 2015
Mike Gong hasn't lost his marbles. He's selling them. His intricate, pscychedelic designs, each a clash of bright colors, are embedded in tiny glass globes. These miniature glass art pieces range in diameter from about 13mm to 50mm, and as you turn them, the design shifts. They feature both abstract patterns and, in his Acid Eaters collection, the more direct: monstrous faces holding tabs of acid on their tongues. 
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