Expressing Abstract Mathematical Concepts Through Art

Illustration // Friday, January 23, 2015
Anatoly Timofeevich Fomenko is a distinguished Russian mathematician, professor, well-known topologist, supporter of radically revising historical chronology, and it turns out, very talented at expressing abstract mathematical concepts through artwork. "Since the mid-1970s, Fomenko has created more than 280 graphic works. Fomenko description of his technique probably sounds unlike anything that most of us have ever previously heard or learned about drawing. He never starts with rough sketches, copies, or outlines. Rather the final drawing appears all at once as a clean copy. "Each mark is final, and my hand does not return to it again". He compares his technique to the process of developing a photo "like using a rag to wipe a thick layer of dust from a picture that already exists".

Ekaterina Panikanova's Paintings on Books

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, January 13, 2015
Russian artist Ekaterina Panikanova paints across deliberately arranged spreads of old books and documents. The groupings of book act as a single but interrupted canvas for beautiful paintings and illustrations.

Paintings by Slava Fokk

Juxtapoz // Friday, January 09, 2015
The greatest challenge an artist faces is to adequately channel his first bursts of creative energy. It is necessary to constantly work at improving one’s skills in order to effectively tackle this challenge. I combine these practically obsolete concepts with modern decorative themes. In the present body of work, I wanted to create a slightly nostalgic atmosphere.

Best of 2014: The Russian Criminal Tattoo Archive

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, December 16, 2014
This unique archive documents Russian criminals' tattoos and their coded meanings. Included in the collection are more than three thousand tattoo drawings made by Danzig Baldaev during his time as a prison guard between 1948 and 1986. Tattoos were his gateway into a secret world in which he acted as ethnographer, recording the rituals of a closed society...

Russian Criminal Tattoo Police Files @ Grimaldi Gavin, London

Juxtapoz // Monday, October 27, 2014
Russian Criminal Tattoo Police Files is a selection of photographs of Russian prisoners tattoos collected by Arkady Bronnikov between the mid-1960s and mid-1980s. A senior expert in criminalistics at the USSR Ministry of Internal Affairs for over thirty years, part of Bronnikov's duties involved visiting correctional institutions of the Ural and Siberia regions.

The Work of Igor & Marina

Juxtapoz // Monday, June 23, 2014
We are loving the work of Russian-born husband-and-wife team Igor Kozlovsky and Marina Sharapova. 'Characterized by a remarkable fusion of seemingly discordant elements: past present, figurative and abstract, traditional and avant-garde,' their work together features Renaissance-era figures floating over backgrounds of cryptic text and pattern 'while areas of intricate, realistic detail coexist with expanses of layered color.'

Images From Russia’s First Fashion Magazine

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, June 03, 2014
In addition to luxurious illustrations and advanced Constructivist models, the magazine offered an overview of current European trends, in which the Soviet control system saw “vestiges of capitalism.” The fashion magazine’s first issue was its last. If not for the excesses of Soviet censorship, Russia would now have its own Vogue and Harpers Bazaar all rolled into one.

Soviet Anti-Alcohol Posters from the 1920s—60s

Design // Wednesday, May 07, 2014
The Soviets were really good at making poster art in the form of propaganda, so good that even the most horrible messages had a begrudgingly nice look. But we have to say, when the Soviet graphic artists wanted to tackle anti-alcohol subjects, they make it damn effective.

It's Not Milk Paintings by Ivan Alifan

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, May 07, 2014
This series is an exploration of the modern gaze; of ambiguous figurative paintings that are revealed and transformed within the act of the individuals' views. These portraits are not an attempt to render physical characteristics but rather create a language of underlying sexual subtexts. Using ambiguity as a tool demands the viewer's exploration of their psyches and provokes self awareness...

Valeriy Klamm’s Window into Everyday Russian Living

Photography // Monday, February 24, 2014
In 2009, Russian photographer Valeriy Klamm created an online webspace and blog where over 60 Russian photographers ranging from photographic dabblers to award-winning professionals could post their own images capturing the true essence of everyday living throughout Russia. The project, which is titled “Moles on the Map”...


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