Photographs by Jerome Abramovitch

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, October 29, 2013
Jerome Abramovitch is a Montreal-based photographer. His creativity has been immortalized twice in the Guinness World Book of Records, and worldwide media such as 'Ripley's Believe It or Not!' have featured his work. The stark honesty of his photographs is a testament to who he is as an artist, the eccentric characters that surround him, and the intimate bonds they share.

Frederic Fontenoy's Fusion and Métamorphose

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, October 29, 2013
These two series, Metamorphose and Fusion were taken by French photographer Frederic Fontenoy between 1988 and 1992. The first, amazing blurred, abstract photos of people jumping, flipping, and contorting themselves and the second of bizarre limbs and body parts seemingly missing key parts, placed in nature.

Love to Death

Erotica // Saturday, October 26, 2013
Maxwell Snow, 1984, USA, is a young photographer who's works are not always easy to digest. Younger brother of the late New York-based artist Dash Snow,  Maxwell creates series of images that each have their own story, from erotic macabre death tombs to burning skeletons at a KKK gathering to an image of a girl who had been locked in her room for many years by her parents.  Love these to Death.

Paul Schneggenburger's Sleep Portraits

Juxtapoz // Thursday, October 24, 2013
In these fascinating time-lapse photos, Austrian photographer Paul Schneggenburger captures lovers 'dancing' as they sleep. He began project this project at his University back in 2010, and since then, more than 80 couples and families have volunteered to be photographed during their sleep in a black bed in Paul's candle-lit studio apartment. While they slumber, the camera hangs above bed and shoots ONE exposure for over six hours.

"Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950" @ Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C

Juxtapoz // Thursday, October 24, 2013
This looks to be a fantastic show, opening today in our nation's capital, with a special lecture this Saturday, October 26, featuring Yoko Ono and Raphael Montañez Ortiz, "participants in the original 1966 Destruction in Art Symposium; artist Monica Bonvicini; and art historian Dario Gamboni will explore the ways in which artists have used destruction as a means of responding to cultural and social issues."

Ryan McGinley "Yearbook" @ Ratio 3, SF

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, October 23, 2013
Well, you got 3 days to check this one out if you are in Northern California. Ryan McGinley has returned to Ratio 3 in San Francisco for one of our favorite installations of the year, Yearbook, featuring an entire site-specific, immersive installation of McGinley's color portraits of... well, a ton of naked men and women who would have done well at the Arcade Fire show in Brooklyn this past weekend. To be honest, all together, in all this color, the installation is quite stunning, and you have until October 26th to see it. 

Michael Wolf's "The Architecture of Density"

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, October 23, 2013
Michael Wolf's photographic study of Hong Kong, "The Architecture of Density," features photos of the city's buildings photographed without the horizon. "...By using this stylistic solution by eliminating the sky and horizon you give the feeling of unlimited size, because you have no idea how big the building is. It could be 100 stories or 200 stories, it could be a mile long. This illusion of unlimited size really conveys what we experience in megacities."

Pieter Hugo's "There's a Place in Hell for Me and My Friends"

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, October 23, 2013
This morning we take a look back at one of our favorite photographers, Pieter Hugo's series There's a Place in Hell for Me and My Friends, a series of close-up portraits of the artist and his friends, all of whom call South Africa home. Through a digital process of converting colour images to black and white while manipulating the colour channels, Hugo emphasizes the pigment (melanin) in his sitters' skins so they appear heavily marked by blemishes and sun damage.

Vintage Photos From Baseball's Early Days

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, October 23, 2013
Just in time for the start of the World Series today, we happened upon these vintage photos from the beginnings of baseball. Part of a collection at the New York Public Library, the photos were collected by A.G. Spalding, a former pitcher and entrepreneur who was a major force in the professionalization and commercialization of baseball in the 19th century. "You get some funny instances, these baseball players essentially before a backdrop of a Victorian garden, the sort of humorous fakery of a ball suspended on a string."

Photographs by Irving Penn

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, October 22, 2013
Irving Penn was an American photographer who was known for his fashion photography, portraits and still lifes. Penn found success as both as a Vogue magazine photographer and an internationally exhibited artist. He photographed Marcel Duchamp, Picasso, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Igor Stravinsky, just to name a few!