From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried

Photography // Wednesday, April 16, 2014
From 1995 to 1996 photographer Carrie Mae Weems created a groundbreaking body of work titled “From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried”. The series is made up of 34 appropriated images from the 19th and 20th-centuries which she reprinted using a red filter and framed under glass that had been sandblasted with overlying text. 

Deadbeat Club: Field Trip @ Seeing Things Gallery

Photography // Tuesday, April 15, 2014
This upcoming weekend, Seeing Things Gallery in San Jose will present a photography group show by Deadbeat Club entitled “Field Trip” and we think it would be wise of you to go! The show will feature the work of six photographers that include Grant Hatfield, Deanna Templeton, Ed Templeton, Clint Woodside, Devin Briggs and Nolan Hall, who were all connected through the sub-cultures of skateboarding and/or art to start making zines. 

Henri Cartier-Bresson Retrospective

Photography // Tuesday, April 15, 2014
From February to June 9, 2014 there will be a 70 year retrospective of photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson on display at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, France. Along with being an astounding documentary photographer, he also coined the term “decisive moment”in reference to what made his images so profound. 

Grisly images from Legendary photographer Enrique Metinides a.k.a. “Mexican Weegee”

Photography // Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Enrique Metinides is a Mexican photographer who documented the grislier side of life in Mexico City. He has often been referred to as the “Mexican Weegee” because of the dark subject matter and intimate access to police sites. But this label, while accurate in some ways, seems to fall short of this mans legendary documents. His compositions are well considered which make the images conflicting. 

André Kertész

Photography // Monday, April 14, 2014
Twenty-five years after his death, André Kertész (1894–1985) is today a world-famous photographer who produced images that will be familiar to everyone, but he has yet to receive full recognition for his personal contribution to the language of photography in the 20th century. His career spanning more than seventy years was chaotic, and his longevity was matched by an unwavering creative acuity that rendered difficult an immediate or retrospective understanding of his work" as stated by Jeu de Paume Gallery.

Against The Wall

Photography // Monday, April 14, 2014
With the release of Martin Parr’s two volume (now three volume) “The Photobook: A History”came exposure to a photo book titled “Against the Wall” by Pekka Turunen published in 1996. Turunen’s odd, yet colorful images depicted a world which appeared foreign and almost imaginary. 

The photography of Albert Renger-Patzsch

Photography // Monday, April 14, 2014
Albert Renger-Patzsch’s “Life Is Beautiful" published in 1928 is one of the most pivotal photographic books ever produced. He is often over-looked or forgotten as a pioneering photographer because of the huge abundance of prolific photographers coming out of Germany. He had a great compositional eye but also had extremely progressive thoughts for his time which could still be considered contemporary today...

A look at The New York Times Magazine’s "Photographs" book

Photography // Sunday, April 13, 2014
Although this book was released a few years back, as it stared at us from out shelf, we felt inclined to take you on a preview through its dense pages filled with commissioned work from some of the most celebrated and skilled photographers around. The New York Times Magazine’s Photographs was edited by long-time photo editor Kathy Ryan and is a collection of various contributors photography divided into four sections...

HIS NAME IS SANDER DEKKER

Erotica // Sunday, April 13, 2014
Sander Dekker is a photographer out in the Netherlands that does a stunning job capturing the sexuality and appeal that is only apparent in the comfort of one's own home. That cozy, provocative lust that occurring naturally...

American Prospects

Photography // Saturday, April 12, 2014
In the 1970’s and 80’s photographer Joel Sternfeld photographed across America to create his series “American Prospects”. Using the culture that he found during his travels, Sternfeld had an uncanny eye for the absurdity in each scene. From a fireman buying a pumpkin from a farm stand in front of a burning building to a family looking over the edge of the Glen Canyon Dam with a baby in a play pen behind them appearing unsupervised and staring at the photographer, each image invites the viewer to explore the potential disasters and absurd scenes that each photograph conveys.  

Gallery

Every image in one place

Vault

Full magazine features from Juxtapoz

visit the VAULT >