Ian Webb

Photography // Sunday, May 11, 2014
Perusing the photography of Ian Webb elicits emotions similar to what one might feel traveling the world in a moment; to become a part of each culture's most personal routines and expeditions and feel the waters of the Yangtze run through your fingers in one moment and the cobbled streets of London beneath your feet in the next. 

Mid-Century Postwar Italian Photography

Photography // Saturday, May 10, 2014
Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, Federico Fellini. These were the pillars of Italian Neorealism; the auteurs who captured the psyche and desolate conditions of the Italian lower-class from 1944 to 1952, lost in a desperation that poverty begets. Their contemporaries, photographers like Ugo Zovetti, Ferruccio Crovatto, and Bruno Rosso, used their medium in similar fashion. 

The work of Michael Wolf

Photography // Friday, May 09, 2014
Michael Wolf is a German photographer who grew up across the Europe and America. His work revolves around mega cities and densely packed areas of humans. His work broadly addresses vernacular themes of this existence through various photographic projects, which tend to isolate a singular aspect. 

Nikki S. Lee

Photography // Friday, May 09, 2014
In her photographic series “Projects”, South Korean artist Nikki S. Lee fully immersed herself a-la-Daniel Day Lewis into each role she portrayed in her photographs. From ethnic groups to style driven social cliques to the elderly, each person she portrayed took on it’s own project which also served as each image’s title; for example “The Drag Queen Project”, “The Punk Project”, and “The Yuppie Project”. 

The Farm Security Administration

Photography // Thursday, May 08, 2014
As a result of the New Deal, the United States formed The Farm Security Administration in an effort to combat the rise in rural poverty throughout the country, much as a result of the Dust Bowl. As part of their efforts, the FSA began a photography program that consisted of eleven photographers who were to document the hardships of the American people and the lives they were forced to live. 

Behind the Scenes Photos From 2001: A Space Odyssey

Juxtapoz // Thursday, May 08, 2014
Occasionally here on the site we like to search out behind the scenes photos from the sets of some of our favorite directors and their films. Not too long ago we showed you Chewbacca's photos from the set of Star Wars and late last year we took a look at photos from Stanley Kubrick's The Shining. We hope you enjoy this morning's addition: behind the scene photos from Kubrick's sci-fi masterpiece, 2001: A Space Odyssey.

The coal mining and migrant workers of China by Song Chao

Photography // Wednesday, May 07, 2014
Song Chao is a Chinese photographer who focuses on portraiture of specific groups. Primarily he has cohesively documented the coal mining and migrant workers of China. He uses a white backdrop and artificial lighting to remove these people from their environment and emphasize their strong character and faces in similar fashion to Avedon. 

Formento & Formento

Photography // Wednesday, May 07, 2014
In the photographic works of husband and wife team Formento & Formento, it’s easy to see their inspiration and love for theatrical narratives. Echoing the dramatic lighting of Hithcock, the depictions of solitude by Edward Hopper, and the versatile female roles portrayed by Cindy Sherman, each image is it’s own story belonging to each character depicted in the photographs. 

the work of Mark Cohen

Photography // Tuesday, May 06, 2014
Mark Cohen is often forgotten as one of the most inventive street photographers. It’s easier to make up close images in big cities with crowds. Mark Cohen works in smaller suburban areas in an extremely fragmented and graphic style. He points out the specific things of interest, creating surreal compositions with body parts. Often he seeks out children and youth culture in oddly sexualized images of children in bathing suits or a group of boys sucking on cigarettes and lollipops. The compositions are daring and nightmarish.

Andreas Gursky's large architectural and landscape photographs

Photography // Monday, May 05, 2014
Andreas Gursky is one of the most prominent photographers of the past two decades. His work is large scale and deals with colossal structures and collective existence. The photographs are from a very objective and high up perspective, creating broad landscapes with an impersonal feeling. We see people working in factories and the stock exchange, a 99-cent store rife with colorful objects juxtaposed with the minimal aesthetic of a Prada store. 

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