The work of Paul Seawright

Photography // Tuesday, April 01, 2014
Paul Seawright is a Northern Irish documentary photographer. The majority of his projects aim to disseminate the highly complex issues of religious turmoil between sects of Christianity within his native land. Both the Protestants and the Catholics feel a sense of belonging that ties into larger political and moral beliefs, which each group perceives to be at odds with the other, creating tension and violence.

"The Factory Photographs" by David Lynch

Photography // Monday, March 31, 2014
Oscar-winning auteur David Lynch brilliantly re-appropriates his brooding, cinematic aesthetic in his first photography book, The Factory Photographs, and his coinciding exhibition at Photographers’ Gallery, curated by Petra Giloy-Hirtz. Fascinated by windswept factories and the dark, enigmatic quality of smokestacks, detached pipes, and the textures of decay, Lynch's denuded black-and-white photographs were shot in various locations including New York, Poland, Germany and England. 

Andrew Waits’s “Boondock” Takes Us Off-The-Grid

Photography // Monday, March 31, 2014
In photographer Andrew Waits’s series “Boondock”, he photographed throughout the western United States searching for a subculture of individuals and communities that live a nomadic lifestyle whether by choice or necessity brought on by hardship. Waits explores how each subject has redefined their own definition of “home”by creating one in vehicles such as cars, vans, and RVs.

“Office” by Lars Tunbjörk

Photography // Monday, March 31, 2014
Lars Tunbjörk’s book on offices shows us the many different aspects of what it’s like to work in one of these tiny compartmentalized work areas. There are stark interiors of off-white and grey, fluorescent mazes, protruding wires, jumbles of paper work, and over worked employees. Tunbjörk uses a very direct flash to illuminate this sanitized environment.

Marcel Christ's Exploding, Bursting, and Smoking Colors

Juxtapoz // Monday, March 31, 2014
Marcel Christ uses a modified flash and extremely high shutter speeds (up to 1/10,0000th of a second) to capture exploding, bursting clouds of colored powder and paint. "What attracts me the most [to this way of working], Christ recently told Wired, "is that you start from scratch, you start with nothing...

The work of Dana Lixenberg

Photography // Sunday, March 30, 2014
Dana Lixenberg is a Dutch photographer, her book THE LAST DAYS OF SHISHMAREF is a wonderful documentation of a disappearing Alaskan town. The population is tiny and Lixenberg intimately documents many aspects of the people lives, in a sincere and anthropological study. 

A portrait of America by Curran Hatleberg

Photography // Saturday, March 29, 2014
Curran Hatleberg has been crisscrossing the country, coast to coast, continuing the photographic tradition popularized by Robert Frank’s “The Americans,” searching for the unknown with the hope to experience the unexpected. His ongoing series “Dogwood" and "The Crowded Edge” are the culmination of five years of shooting, and portrays an array of beautiful moments with unclear narratives. Hatleberg currently resides in Brooklyn, having studied at the University of Colorado and the Yale School of Art. 

Pierre Molinier's Erotic Photo-Montages

Erotica // Saturday, March 29, 2014
Pierre Molinier (1900 - 1976) was a painter, photographer and "maker of objects". He was born in Agen (France) and lived his life in Bordeaux. He began his career by painting landscapes, but his work turned towards a fetishistic eroticism early on. Molinier began to take photographs at the age of 18...

Dennis Morris "BOB MARLEY: GIANT" @ Known Gallery, LA

Photography // Friday, March 28, 2014
Running from March 29—April 12, 2014, Known Gallery in Los Angeles is hosting a special exhibition of 28 intimate portraits and live shots of Bob Marley in black and white and color taken by British photographer, Dennis Morris. The show also coincides with an opening night release of Dennis Morris and Shepard Fairey's collaborative print.

The photography of Park Hong-Chun

Photography // Friday, March 28, 2014
Park Hong-Chun is an internationally renowned Korean photographer. His images eloquently describe human experience and the passing of time yet the photographs are devoid of humans. A series of long exposures from the front of a car window shows blurred greenery mushing together with the long lines on concrete; this is more akin to how people remember their experiences than a crisp photograph.

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