Outtakes From David Bowie's "Heroes" Cover Shoot

Juxtapoz // Monday, August 04, 2014
In our August 2014 issue, we investigate the alter ego's of David Bowie ahead of the David Bowie Is... exhibition arriving in Chicago this September. During our research we came across these outtakes from the 1977 "Heroes" cover shoot by Masayoshi Sukita. Enjoy!

Gateway to Death Valley

Photography // Monday, August 04, 2014
In her photographic series “Gateway to Death Valley”, artist Pamela Littkty documented life in the towns of Baker, California and Beatty, Nevada which both call themselves the gateways to Death Valley. Littky’s images portray the desolate landscape and the weathered inhabitants that choose to call it home. 

photographs by Chris Schoonover

Photography // Sunday, August 03, 2014
Chris Schoonover’s work is a gorgeously executed hybrid between travel diary and fashion portraiture. Photographing the world around him in a richly saturated, nearly cinematic manner, he takes the everyday and makes it pop. His attention to detail is obvious, with each square pixel of his shots sharp and drenched in clear intention. 

Ken Lum's "Portrait-Repeated Text"

Photography // Friday, August 01, 2014
Multimedia artist Ken Lum’s series Portrait-Repeated Text is a striking social commentary and contemporary must-see. Each piece is composed of two parts: a photographic portrait and an accompanying graphic text. This pairing creates a dramatic and impressively human scenario for the viewer, even without any real evidence to validate the subject’s implied struggle.

The work of Katy Shayne

Photography // Friday, August 01, 2014
Katy Shayne’s photographs feel a bit like the childhood scrapbook of David Lynch, emphasizing on the grotesque with a pretty major dash of female identity. Smashing innocence with vulgarity, and at times, even horror, Shayne creates her own unique genre of photography—her work is perhaps summarized best as the photo diary of a child addicted to collecting ghost stories, baby teeth, spell books, and Nancy Drew novels.

The photography of Phebe Schmidt

Photography // Friday, August 01, 2014
Phebe Schmidt is challenging our perception and digestion of the world around us, one pastel-hued, glossy photograph at a time. The Australia native bears a bold, pop style not unlike the work of Toilet Paper and Maurizio Cattelan, among several other influential contemporary photographers, but the driving force behind Schmidt’s work sets her apart (not to mention her cultivation of equally revolting and seductive imagery). 

The work of Joanna Szproch

Photography // Thursday, July 31, 2014
Joanna Szproch’s striking photographs border on surreal, with a clever eye for composition and form. Her work carries a sense of spontaneity reminiscent of Ellen von Unwerth with a clever wit and an eye for storytelling that brings to mind the work of Tim Walker. 

Olivia Bee’s Romanticized Images of “Lovers”

Photography // Thursday, July 31, 2014
In her series “Lovers,” Brooklyn-based photographer Olivia Bee explores the nostalgia of teenage romance. From innocent kisses captured in a dusk lit garden to intimate moments of sleeping side by side, Bee truly captures the warmest elements of a new relationship. Through her romanticized use of lighting and her raw candid compositions, the viewer is invited to relive the tender moments that she so intimately captures.

Kostis Fokas's explores the human body, Faceless

Photography // Thursday, July 31, 2014
London-based photographer Kostis Fokas speaks about his work saying, “Through my photos I wish to present a new take on the human body and explore its infinite capabilities. The use of quirky, and sometimes hidden faces communicates exactly that. Unlike photography that seeks to reveal the feelings of the objects portrayed through the use of faces and expressions, I shift my focus on the complete freedom pertained to the image of a human body."

The work of Robyn Cumming

Photography // Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Robyn Cumming’s aesthetic can be described as Steel Magnolias gone awry, but in the best way possible. Working from the heaps and piles of the stereotypical female imagery we all know and love (or love-to-hate, depending on your own alignments), the Toronto-based artist creates a body of work exploring, exploiting, and evolving the ordinary into something a little more sinister, and far more eccentric. 

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