"Unmodern West" by Parker Stewart

Photography // Sunday, August 30, 2015
Parker Stewart is a Savannah, Georgia based photographer drawn to the banal and vernacular aspects of American life. His series Unmodern West was born on a solo 16,000 mile trip around the Western half of the United States. Looking for scenes that seemed unchanged since the sixties, Stewart captured images of America as it was and somehow still remains. 

"Good River" by Ari Gabel

Photography // Saturday, August 29, 2015
Ari Gabel is an Ohio based photographer whose work deals with the documentation of the vanishing faces and stories held within countless individuals across the American landscape. His project Good River examines the Ohio River Valley, an area of individuals dependants on the local coal mining industry. 

The Photography of Molly Matalon

Photography // Friday, August 28, 2015
Molly Matalon is a Bay Area based photographer whose work deals with the topics of desire, both sexual and aspirational, as well as relationships between women of all ages. Her series Mom examines the relationship with her mother, shot at her south Florida family home.

Thomas Prior and Jake Michaels document Santa Anita Park

Photography // Wednesday, August 26, 2015
Coincidently both in Los Angeles at the same time and deciding that a collaboration was needed, photographer Thomas Prior and filmaker Jake Michaels took to the Santa Anita Park outside of Los Angeles over the course of three weekends. With Prior shooting stills of everything but the races and Michaels catching the various moments in between, the two captured a unique vision of cohesiveness with both video and photography.  

Chris Rhodes "Hotel Mermaid Club"

Photography // Wednesday, August 26, 2015
Today we take a look at the series Hotel Mermaid Club by photographer Chris Rhodes, who was born in Macclesfield but is now based in London. Sparse and tranquil, Rhodes photographs have an emotional quality that sets a certain mood.

Matthew Brookes' Portraits of Dancers

Photography // Wednesday, August 26, 2015
Fashion photographer Matthew Brookes’ has completed a black-and-white photography portrait series on male ballet dancers of Paris. Taken over a year, Brookes’ brought the dancers into a space separate from their normal dance studios. The dancers were asked to interpret, through movement, the idea of birds falling from the sky. Brookes is publishing a book of the portraits, which is currently available for preorder and will be released in September, 2015. 

Lynn Saville's "Dark City" @ Pratt Institute's Photography Gallery, Brooklyn

Photography // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Dark City is a natural sequel to Lynn Saville's colour photographs in Night/Shift (Monacelli, 2009). Her work in that book made her, in the words of Arthur C. Danto, "the Atget of vanishing New York, prowling her city at the other end of the day, picking up pieces of the past in the present, just before it is swallowed in shadows." 

Eric Meola's Color-Blocked Documentary Photography

Photography // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
It’s clear Eric Meola is attracted to bright colors. His documentary photography is, at times, so focused on color and patterns that it reads at first as an abstract painting. His series have addressed subjects ranging from lights in Iceland to storms in middle America. At times he adjusts the color in his photos, changing them to match the intensity of the images in his memory.  

Tony Gleaton, Portrait Photographer Focused on Black Life, Dies at 67

Photography // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Tony Gleaton, a portrait photographer focusing on black life, died on August 15th at the age of 67. Born in Detroit, Gleaton began his photography in the late 1970s in New York fashion photography, but quit to pursue what would become a decades-long exploration of what it means to be black. He photographed African Americans in the United States, but also traveled to Central and South America and Samoa for his portraits. 

Laurie Simmons' Dollers' Costume Portrait Series

Photography // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
In this striking portrait series, Laurie Simmons photographs women and men dressed up as dolls in the tradition of the Japanese subculture Kirigumi—a type of cosplay, or costume play. In these portraits, people wear latex doll masks and bodysuits, creating distinct characters.
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