Elliott Landy's "Opening Night" released by Imperial Publishing

Photography // Sunday, July 05, 2015
Imperial publishing has recently released Opening Night, a limited edition book compiling photographs shot in the ‘60s by Elliot Landy. The images of various celebrities and socialites were shot over 6 months when Landy had access to the most premier celebrity parties. Celebrities such as Elizabeth Taylor, Faye Dunaway, Marlene Dietrich, Andy Warhol, Dustin Hoffman, Lauren Bacall and many more all appear in Landy’s newest book.

"A lie about a lie, A truth about a truth" @ Little Big Man Gallery, Los Angeles

Photography // Saturday, July 04, 2015
In 2014, photographer and director Tyrone Lebon made “Reely and Truly”, a diaristic and personal documentary about photography. The film begins with Lebon’s father Mark, who is also a photographer, reading to camera: “This is a film about photography, and therefore a film about lies. Even the nature of truth, possibly a lie about a lie, or a truth about The truth.."

The Photographs of Viktoria Sorochinski

Photography // Friday, July 03, 2015
Photographer Viktoria Sorochinski’s work gracefully combines documentary and fantasy. Her work examines relationships, particularly family dynamics. Much of her work also includes children and encompasses themes of morality, personal growth, and innocence. Sorochinski’s photographs are full of both intimacy and imagination. According to the artist: “My work process is very intuitive and my aim as an artist is to create the conditions that will allow these moments of revelation to occur in front of my camera.”

Jacob Aue Sobol's "Arrivals and Departures" @ Yossi Millo Gallery, New York

Photography // Thursday, July 02, 2015
Arrivals and Departures chronicles Jacob Aue Sobol’s travels across the Asian continent by train during 2012-2014, with stops in Moscow, Russia; Ulan Batar, Mongolia and Beijing, China, and numerous rural communities along the way. During three separate month-long trips, Sobol photographed the changing landscape from his window seat, as well as encounters with inhabitants of the locations where he disembarked. 

“Body Language” by Martin Kruck

Photography // Thursday, July 02, 2015
In his series, “Body Language,” photographer Martin Kruck captured messages imprinted on skin. These cryptic messages such as “too late” are made even more curious with their indentation on the human body. The marks appear to be temporary which contributes to the ephemeral nature of the work.

The Bewitched Bee by Duane Michals

Photography // Tuesday, June 30, 2015
Duane Stephen Michals is an American photographer known widely for his traditional, editorial photo essays as well as the sequence photographs he began making in New York in 1966. The Bewitched Bee (1986) is one such sequential project. The series of 5x7 silver gelatin prints features handwritten segments of text that, when arranged by the number at the top of the frame, create a personal narrative. 

“Plucked” by Geir Moseid

Photography // Tuesday, June 30, 2015
Geir Mosied (b. 1978) is a Norwegian photographer whose work is derived from recounts of domestic, everyday life. His series “Plucked” examines various themes ranging from alienation, segregation, and the relationship between humans and constructed spaces. According to the artist, “The home is often known to be a safe space where one can be private and intimate. The home has a sentiment of security that is built around the fact that we can seclude ourselves, distancing oneself from the interference and surveillance of others.” 

“The Mark of Abel” by Lydia Panas

Photography // Monday, June 29, 2015
In the immensely stunning series “The Mark of Abel,” photographer Lydia Panas photographed families as her subject matter. Panas captures family dynamics in a uniquely tender and vulnerable manner. The series reveals a complex range of emotions and a deep sense of the human condition. 

“Black Mirror” @ Aperture Gallery, NY

Photography // Monday, June 29, 2015
Opening on July 16, Aperture’s annual open-call exhibition will be on display until August 13. Photographers were asked “to consider the ways in which our current reality might outpace outlandish narratives of science fiction. The title Black Mirror is borrowed from the 2011 British television series of the same name, which imagines a dystopian near future—a Twilight Zone for the age of the smartphone”. 

The work of Magdalena Switek

Photography // Sunday, June 28, 2015
We were checking out the newest issue of Hamburger eyes today (We highly recommended you pick up a copy) and were curious who shot the exceptional photograph that graces the cover. With a little investigating, we landed on the name Magdalena Switek. 
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