For All Mankind: Vintage NASA Photographs 1964–1983

Juxtapoz // Thursday, January 23, 2014
An exhibition, "For All Mankind: Vintage NASA Photographs 1964-1983," opened at Breese Little in London yesterday. 'This exhibition comprises an overview of space exploration from 1964 to 1983, providing a comprehensive selection of over 100 rare and vintage NASA photographs. The achievements of NASA and the Apollo programme languished in the popular imagination from the end of the 1970s until the early 2000s, neglected in the wake of previous euphoria...

Gemini: The Outtakes from Space

Juxtapoz // Saturday, September 21, 2013
We have many debates in the Juxtapoz office about the 1969 moon landing, with one person in particular pretty convinced a good desert in Arizona would be a nice set for a hoax. One reason: The photography was just so good. All those iconic shots on the moon, remember, were shot by two men who happened to be, you know, making history unlike any the world had ever seen...

NASA's Space Station Concept Drawings From the '70s

Juxtapoz // Friday, August 09, 2013
The early 70s saw America's first space station built and occupied. Following a successful trip to the moon (so they say), the possibilities were endless and within reach! Space colony? Sure! These illustrations were commissioned by NASA and depicted each artist's vision of the future of space stations. 

Universe Art: A Hurricane on Saturn

Juxtapoz // Thursday, May 02, 2013
This incredible image was taken last November by the Cassini spacecraft of a hurricane on the surface of Saturn. Launched in 1997 to study Saturn, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft arrived in 2004 and has been primarily studying the Great White Spot, a massive storm that occurs every 30 years. The Hurricane image is one of the first sunlit detailed views of Saturn's north pole. The eye of the storm is approximately 1,250 miles wide and spinning about 330 miles per hour!

A Sun Eruption, Captured

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, September 11, 2012
We are going to call this "solar art." Something so amazing, so incredibly documented, that it almost seems like it can't be real and it has to be a painting or digital manipulation. From NASA, "On August 31, 2012 a long filament of solar material that had been hovering in the sun's atmosphere, the corona, erupted out into space at 4:36 p.m. EDT.

Mars Panorama by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 12, 2012
Courtesy of NASA's panoramic camera (known as the Pancam) on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, we now have a new view of the Martian landscape. It is quite an incredible image of our much fantasized about neighbor in the solar system. Here are some details from NASA themselves: "This scene recorded from the mast-mounted color camera includes the rover's own solar arrays and deck in the foreground, providing a sense of sitting on top of the rover and taking in the view."

Gallery

Every image in one place

Vault

Full magazine features from Juxtapoz

visit the VAULT >