Stardust by Sergio Albiac

Illustration // Monday, July 22, 2013
Sergio Albiac is a visual artist based in Barcelona, Spain, whose process of production involves writing computer programs to generate complex images of beauty and emotion. In his latest artist foray into "generative portraiture," Albiac employs the concept of nucleosynthesis, essentially the cosmic creation of stardust, to compose automated collage portraits that source photographs from The Hubble Space Telescope. The resulting images are not only universally appealling as works of abstracted beauty, but also representative of our place in the cosmos as material beings essentially made of star stuff.

Lin Xue's Organic Meditations

Illustration // Monday, July 22, 2013
It's a true visual feast to study the fine lines and curving shapes of  Hong Kong-based artist Lin Xue's intricate and contemplative work. Intuitively created after long sojourns into the mountains of China, Xue's tools of choice reflect the raw, elemental contents of his drawings; sharpened shards of bamboo dipped in pools of ink depict the most basic structures of life in a thriving ecosystem, interpreted on paper through a dreamlike veil of almost otherworldly beauty. The self-taught artist has always been drawn to the "orchestral energy" of the natural world, attempting to recreate its resonating vibrations through the meditative process of his art.

Higgs Boson Mural by Josef Kristofoletti

Illustration // Monday, July 15, 2013
This impressive time-lapse video presents the painstaking work undertaken by international artist Josef Kristofoletti to create a three story tall mural for the ATLAS Experiment at CERN, or the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Collaborating closely on location with CERN physicists, over the course of a year Kristofoletti developed a project that visually interpreted what the Higgs boson might possibly look like. The result is an astonishing mural that captures the spirit of inquiry present in and essential to the pursuit of science and the artistic process.

Irene Shkarovska's Lovely Osteology

Illustration // Monday, July 15, 2013
Ukrainian graphic designer and illustrator Irene Shkarovska has created some exceedingly beautiful and stylish illustrations for an anatomical book on osteology, or the scientific study of bones. Her delicate linework and use of faded colors elevates these pieces from detached scientific views of human bone to visually exquisite interpretations of our skeletal structures. Shkarovska's creations follow in a long line of science art that serves both its objective purpose as well as appeals to the creative eye and sense of aesthetic pleasure, mirroring the sensation of awe and wonder that motivates all scientific thought and progress.

Man as Beast by Charlotte Caron

Illustration // Monday, July 15, 2013
This series of images from French artist Charlotte Caron combine photographic portraits with the painted faces of various animals in an attempt to reconcile humanity's duality as both man and beast, seemingly civilized and beyond the feral forces of nature, yet also irrevocably bound to it and part of it. Our inner beast is lifted to the surface in Caron's paintings, still partially recognizable as human yet expressing the visceral souls of animals, whose behaviors and proclivities we still share despite our greatest efforts to deny it. Perhaps coming to terms with our animal-selves will help humanity see nature as a part of our deepest identity, its survival intertwined eternally with our own.

Daniel Martin Diaz and The Soul of Science

Illustration // Monday, July 08, 2013
Based in Tucson, Arizona, Daniel Martin Diaz is a fine artist with an insatiable curiosity to explore the mysteries of life and science through creative production. In his forthcoming collection of art and essays, "Soul of Science," Diaz tackles the elusive properties of consciousness and time through a personal visual language that draws inspiration from the old Flemish masters as well as from modern scientific theories.  Intespersed among Diaz's exquisitely rendered pieces are several illuminating writings contributed by mathematicians, physicists, and art historians, each examining the same universal questions from their unique academic and individual perspectives.

Nature's Bounty by Kate Macdowell

Illustration // Monday, July 08, 2013
Kate Macdowell is a ceramic sculptor whose delicately carved pieces entwine the beauty and universal order of the natural world with aspects of humanity's deleterious impact on the environment, responding to issues of climate change, toxic pollution, and GM crops. Her work also borrows its symbolic content from myth, art history, figures of speech, and other cultural formulas. A master craftswoman, Macdowell sculpts each piece out of porcelain, with smaller forms built petal by petal, branch by branch, allowing the artist to immerse herself in intensive, up-close study of nature's fundamental structures and most individual specimens.

Martin Wittfooth's Tooth and Claw

Illustration // Monday, July 08, 2013
Born in 1981 in Toronto and spending most of his childhood in Finland, Martin Wittfooth is a New York City-based artist with an MFA from the School of Visual Arts. His luminous yet foreboding oil paintings portray scenes of nature fighting against the destructive hand of man, whether it's the toxic industries he's created or the evolutionary havoc he is wreaking on the animal kingdom. Humanity's footprint is forever etched into the landscapes of the earth, and through a powerful visual narrative Wittfooth explores its lasting effects through representations of animals interacting with man's industrial and societal creations, a sort of cautionary tale of what's potentially to come.

Angela Palmer's Life Lines

Illustration // Monday, July 08, 2013
Angela Palmer is an Oxford-based sculptor and installation artist who uses CT and MRI scans of heads and bodies to create three dimensional works on engraved sheets of glass. Depicting mesmerizing networks of veins and sinewy brain matter, Palmer's ambitious work conveys a dual sense of grotesque vigor and innate frailty, illustrating the robust nature of the human body as well as its organic fragility. From certain angles the clusters of lines appear jumbled and random, but when when viewed just-so, they acquire their proper shape, whether of a horse's brain or a mummy's body or the head of the artist herself.

Katrina Grouw's Unfeathered Birds

Illustration // Monday, July 01, 2013
Based in Buckinghamshire, England, Katrina Van Grouw is a freelance fine artist and scientific illustrator with an MA in Natural History Illustration. Although she has no formal scientific training, Van Grouw's profound ornithological knowledge and personal fascination with birds has led her to create one of the most richly illustrated books on bird anatomy ever produced, "The Unfeathered Bird." The collection of over 300 drawings offers a refreshingly original insight into the skeletal and muscular structures of birds, showing them in lifelike positions engaged in behaviors typical of their particular species.
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