Yasuaki Oishi's Negative Space "Reverse of Volume RG" Installations

Juxtapoz // Thursday, June 20, 2013
Using translucent plastic sheets and hot black glue, Japanese artist Yasuaki Oishi shapes amazing floating sculptures. His process begins by draping the plastic over some sort of mold, whether it be cardboard boxes, or in the most recent case, a car. He then ties lines of string above the plastic and proceeds to drip the hot black glue down over the string to the plastic. When "mold" is removed, voila! Watch a video after the jump...

Teppei Kaneuji's Plastic Hair Assemblages

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, June 19, 2013
This series by Japanese artist Teppei Kaneuji is entitled Teenage Fan Club. Known for his found-object assemblages, the artist uses plastic toys, scissors, helmets, and in this case, removable hair, gluing them together in bizarrely fascinating and colorful arrangements.

Nakamura Hiroshi's 1950s Protest Art

Juxtapoz // Thursday, June 13, 2013
Born in 1932, Nakamura Hiroshi was trained by the Japan Art Alliance as a reportage painter. The Alliance was 'a postwar art group that advocated politically-themed realist painting.' By the 50s, Hiroshi was very involved in depicting protests against the rise of U.S. military bases. He saw himself as a 'reporter at the frontlines' of confrontations, brandishing sketchbook and pencil as opposed to a camera.

Intricate Paper Sculptures by Nahoko Kojima

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, June 04, 2013
Using a single sheet of paper, Japanese artist Nahoko Kojima intricately cuts sculptures of animals and textures. While some are encased in acrylic sheets, others are installed in three-dimensions. She is currently hard at work on a life-sized swimming polar bear constructed from a single sheet of white Washi paper. The artwork, titled Byaku, will be on display at the Jerwood Space in London beginning next month. Watch a video after the jump!

Saltworks by Motoi Yamammoto

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, June 04, 2013
Japanese artist Motoi Yamammoto creates stunning installations with one simple ingredient: salt. The large-scale installations feature incredible detail and intricate patterns. When you attend a funeral in Japanese culture, sometimes salt is thrown over oneself as a cleansing act. Motoi's sister passed away at a young age and from this tragedy stemmed the idea of using salt in his work, creating what he calls labyrinths and mazes. Watch a video after the jump!

600 Mount Fuji Sunrises by Yu Yamauchi

Juxtapoz // Friday, May 31, 2013
Yu Yamauchi spent five months a year, for four years living in a hut near the summit of Mt. Fuji. Everyday for those five months he would get up at the crack of dawn to photograph the sunrise from the same location. The result is a stunning series of photographs, aptly titled Dawn, of the Earth waking up. What is most incredible about the series is how different one photo looks from the next. "This space, 'above the clouds,' exists far from the ground where we live our daily lives. It is also a space between the earth and the universe." We may have to watch the sunrise this weekend...

Photographs by Lieko Shiga

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, May 28, 2013
Japanese photographer Lieko Shiga's Canary series combines personal stories from local myths with his own personal memories, feelings and experiences. His process involves floating the printed image in the darkroom just as it is appearing and before it settles, generating not easily recognizable, but incredibly fantastical and meaningful photographs. As FOAM magazine puts it, Shiga's "belief in the transcendent power of the photograph verges on the religious."

Unusually Beautiful Japanese Funeral Home Ad

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, May 14, 2013
Generally funerals in Japan are a black and white affair, with any color or deviation considered disrespectful. I&S BBDO, a Tokyo-based ad agency was commissioned by Nishinihon Tenrei funeral home to create an unconventional ad. And that they did! "Creative director Mari Nishimura decided to create a real-size human skeleton made from pressed flowers."

"Yoshitomo Nara" @ Pace Gallery West 25th Street, NYC

Juxtapoz // Monday, May 13, 2013
On Friday night, we stopped by the opening of famed Japanese artist and Juxtapoz cover artist, Yoshitomo Nara's newest body of work at Pace Gallery. Featuring his iconic girl characters, presented in sculpture, painting, and sketches, all spaced wonderfully in three large rooms, Nara continues to be one of the most appreciated contemporary artist in the world.

Nonotak Studio's Installation Hypnotizes and Traps Vistors in a Light Prison

Juxtapoz // Monday, May 13, 2013
The light installation Isotopes v.2 by Nonotak Studio hypnotizes visitors with moving lights, attracting them to the center of the installation. Then, the rhythm and the intensity of the lights continually become more aggressive until they generate immaterial barriers: "it's easy to get in but neigh impossible to get out." The catalyst and inspiration for the project is the Fukushima nuclear disaster and it is meant to echo the way humans approach nuclear power. Watch a video after the jump!

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