Sakuan Izumi's Bright Simplicity

Illustration // Monday, August 19, 2013
After graduating from art school, Sakuan Izumi worked as a graphic designer for 10 years before deciding that she wanted to become an illustrator. She has since developed a style that combines whimsy and humour with clear, simple lines and bright, garish colors. "It is always my goal for my illustrations to make people happy and surprise them at the same time," says Izumi, who often fuses traditional Japanese art techniques with a distinctively modern sensibility. As the artist explains, "I like to boldly defy boundaries and cherish traditions at the same time."

Sae Tachimori's Vibrant Illustrations

Illustration // Monday, August 12, 2013
Born in 1984 in Osaka, Japan, Sae Tachimori began to work as an illustrator after graduating from the Kyoto City University of the Arts. Her whimsical and vivid illustrations harken back to the fantastical and technically magnificent picture books of the early 20th century, erupting with bright, brilliant colors and chocked full of natural elements and symbolic imagery. The complexity and elegance of Tachimori's work puts her at the forefront of the up-and-coming generation of young illustrators making waves in Japan today. 

Meditations by Takahisa Hashimoto

Illustration // Monday, August 12, 2013
Takahisa Hashimoto was born in 1974 in Fukui, Japan. Before graduating from Senshu University with a degree in Business Administration, he started teaching himself graphic design and instead launched a career as a graphic designer and art director in 1998. It wasn't until 2007, while developing brand campaign ads and TV spots, that he began venturing into the world of illustration and discovered his unique artistic voice. Hashimoto's work won the Society of Illustrators 51 Gold Medal in 2008, and he has been recognized across the globe with the numerous international advertisement and illustration awards.

Ladybird's Requiem by Akino Kondoh

Illustration // Monday, August 12, 2013
Born in Chiba, Japan, Akino Kondoh is an artist and animator known for her striking minimalist compositions, often executed with nothing more than graphite and watercolor. Kondoh as exhibited internationally, earning grants from the Japanese Agency for Cultural Affairs, and has also received the support and collaboration of jazz musician John Zorn, who has used her art on his album covers. Her animated short "Ladybird's Requiem" made it to the top 25 list in the biennial showcase "YouTube Play" at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City.

Hayato Jome's Eyes of a Child

Illustration // Monday, August 12, 2013
Born in Akita, Japan, in 1955, artist and illustrator Hayato Jome graduated from the Masahino Art University in Tokyo with a major in oil painting. Currently working freelance, Jome's possesses an undeniable connection with the mind of the child, able to empathize with their troubled thoughts and boundless curiosities through his delicate and guileless illustrative technique.

Installations by Chiharu Shiota

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, August 06, 2013
Japanese born Chiharu Shiota is an installation artist currently living and working in Berlin. She uses various everyday objects such as beds, windows, dresses, shoes and suitcases. She explores the relationships between past and present, living and dying, and memories of people implanted into objects. To these she adds intricate, web-like threads of black and red.

The Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo's Haunted House

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, August 06, 2013
Halloween is still a couple of months away but we're already working on our October issue so we’re starting to get in the mood early. The Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo has a summer exhibition that looks like a lot of fun! Entitled, Ghosts, Underpants and Stars, the exhibition invites children to disobey normally forbidden museum behavior and interact with seemingly endless hallways, mirrored portraits, and other spooky illusions thought up by Torafu Architects.

Mirai Mizue's A Long Day of Timbre

Illustration // Monday, August 05, 2013
Mirai Mizue was born in 1981 in Tokyo and studied animation at Tama Arts University. He is representative of a budding generation of independent Japanese animators who are taking the artform into new territories of abstraction and eccentricity. With an unabating affection for cells and their strange microscopic behaviors, Mizue uses their mutative powers in every frame as they flow in and out of eachother in rhythmical patterns, eventually overtaking the screen in a strange and hypnotic cellular ballet.

Masahiko Saga's Old World Artistry

Illustration // Monday, August 05, 2013
Based in Kyoto, Japan, Masahiko Saga brings an old world sensibility to his contemporary computer generated works, stylistically fusing the art of ukiyo-e, or Japanese woodblock prints, with the modern technology of digital illustration. With one foot in the past and the other placed firmly in the present, Saga's vibrant and complex pieces employ traditional compositions and symbolism with a fresh twist, utilizing the crispness of detail afforded by programs such as Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator to enhance the sumptuous content of his work and essentially blur the lines between old world craftsmanship and present-day art-making methods.

The Dark Whimsy of Fuco Ueda

Illustration // Monday, August 05, 2013
Born in Japan in 1979, Fuco Ueda graduated from the Tokyo Polytechnic University of Arts Graduate School in 2003. Her fanciful and surrealistic paintings are rendered in acrylics and powdered mineral pigments on paper, cloth, and wood, depicting sprightly young girls in fantastic abstract worlds surrounded by vibrantly colored flora and fauna of every shape and size. Her whimsical pieces seem to capture the chimerical sensations of a vivid afternoon daydream, where enigmatic visions are suspended in the floating spaces of the unconscious mind. Ueda has been showing her work in Japan and in the USA since 2000, and she is currently living in Tokyo, Japan.

Vault

Full magazine features from Juxtapoz

visit the VAULT >