Installations by Risa Fukui

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, August 28, 2013
Japanese artist Risa Fukui creates large-scale paper cutouts also known as kirie and hangs them on translucent panels. The intricately cut double-sided pieces cast beautiful shadows on the floor and are on display at the Pola Museum Annex in Tokyo until September 8, 2013. 

Midori Yamada's Strange Seascapes

Illustration // Monday, August 26, 2013
Midori Yamada's whimsical depictions of lithe young girls caressing the scales and tongues of sometimes fearsome looking giant fish are delicately rendered using a combination of watercolors, pens, coffee, and acrylic paint. The artist's fanciful visions seem to take place in some strange space between land and sea, where awesome deep sea fish and tamer freshwater koi live in harmony with gentle schoolgirls. Yamada's fine lines and pale colors lend an extra dash of playfulness and levity to her already fantastic illustrations.

Shohei Otomo's Delinquents

Illustration // Monday, August 26, 2013
Son of the legendary Katsuhiro Otomo, creator of the acclaimed manga and film AKIRA, Shohei Otomo firmly holds his own as a world-class illustrator, creating technically subtle and culturally insightful works that reveal the superficiality of Japan's commercial world and the anarchic attitude of its thriving underbelly. Through his ballpoint pen depictions of "furyo," or Japanese delinquents, Otomo combines traditional motifs with a detached punk conceit, portraying scenes of violence and vulgarity in a unique fusion of realism, manga, and graphic design.

Japan Rocks by Anna Tsubaki

Illustration // Monday, August 26, 2013
Based in Tokyo, Japan, illustrator Anna Tsubaki's bright and kinetic work takes a modern spin on the traditional art of ukiyo-e, using blocks of vivid color and bold linework to create her own visions of a floating world overflowing with rock n' roll swagger. Tsubaki's figures run the gamut from demons to rock stars to ninjas, all possessing a characteristic buoyancy of movement and personality that mimics the insouciant bluster of the rock n' roll lifestyle: cool, confident, and ready to rock your socks off.

Ariko Inaoka's Photographs of Twins

Juxtapoz // Friday, August 23, 2013
Photographer Ariko Inaoka first met Icelandic twins Erna and Hrefna while travelling the country photographing the landscape. She has since returned every year to take pictures of them and continues to until they are 16, documenting the way their relationship changes, as they grow older. We love the series of beautiful and ethereal photos, even finding some of them a little frightening (though this could be because we recently re-watched The Shining)

Underwater, Dramatic Photography by Tomohide Ikeya

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, August 21, 2013
We have shown some stunning underwater photography on the site before, but these delicately, darkly staged works by Tomohide Ikeya are some of the most bizarre and wonderful we have seen to date. The Japanese photographer has turned the her hobby of scuba diving into a conceptual body of work.

Aki Inomata's Plastic Hermit Crab Habitats

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, August 20, 2013
Inspired and influenced by the architecture of major cities, Japanese artist Aki Inomata constructs intricate plastic habitats for hermit grabs. As hermit crabs grow they require larger shells and will exchange them with other crustaceans, so the habitats resembling the skyline of new york or a tokyo house become shelter for the crabs!

Kotaro Chiba's Girlish Innocence

Illustration // Monday, August 19, 2013
Kotaro Chiba is a professional freelance illustrator, designer, and animator based in Niigata, Japan. Her work is clearly heavily influenced by her home country, containing elements of traditional Japanese art as well as anime and manga, showing lithe young women with long delicate necks and soft features in a variety of natural landscapes.

Back To Nature with Hiroki Takeda

Illustration // Monday, August 19, 2013
Continuing in the the artistic tradition of classical Japanese interpretations of the natural world, illustrator Hiroki Takeda creates portraits of animals through delicately placed strokes of watercolor that represent the plant life of each animal's environment, resulting in a beautiful fusion of flora and fauna. Takeda's work possesses a meditative quality in both subject matter and technique, reflecting the artist's own relaxed approach to his art, preferring to begin his work in a calm, introspective manner in order to fully express the emotional intent of each creative piece.

Fashion Savvy from Shouta Sanoda

Illustration // Monday, August 19, 2013
Shouta Sanoda began his education working in product design but quickly found that illustration piqued his interest as a career. His mastery of the mechanical pencil and his unique blend of realism and graphic elements have made him a rising talent in the fashion illustration industry of Japan. Fully devoted to his hand-made craft, Sanoda's detail-rich and finely precise illustrations take about 20 to 30 hours to complete and are completely rendered without any computer manipulation.

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