Yayoi Kusama's "The Obliteration Room"

Juxtapoz // Thursday, October 10, 2013
We have seen some fantastic exhibitions from Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama in the past. Last December's was no exception. As part of her "Look Now, See Forever" Yayoi built and painted a domestic environment white and invited children to cover the entire thing in colorful dot stickers. By the time two weeks had passed, there was very little white left!

The Teshima Art Museum by Ryue Nishizawa

Juxtapoz // Monday, October 07, 2013
The Teshima Art Museum designed by Tokyo-based architect Ryue Nishizawa and Japanese artist Rei Naito opened in 2010 for the Setouchi International Art Festival that was held in the Takamatsu Port area of Japan. The open gallery space features 25cm thick concrete shell with two elliptical openings that are open to elements.

Kisho Kurokawa's Nakagin Capsule Tower

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, September 10, 2013
Standing in Tokyo like a left over prop from a science fiction movie made in the 70s, the Nakagin Capsule Tower designed by Kisho Kurokawa faces the threat of demolition. The building was a prototype for 21st century living in an experimental architectural movement in the 1960s called Metabolism. The building is composed of two concrete towers housing 140 prefabricated modules (capsules) that are self-contained units. The capsules can be connected or combined to create larger spaces and are designed to be replaceable.

Alien Anatomy Sculptures by Masao Kinoshita

Juxtapoz // Friday, September 06, 2013
If there are anatomy classes on some distant planet, or in another dimension, Japanese artist Masao Kinoshita provides the instructional anatomical models. 

Update: The Psychedelic Works of Keiichi Tanaami

Juxtapoz // Friday, August 30, 2013
One of the great Japanese pop and psychedelic artists of the postwar era, we love the mind of Keiichi Tanaami. The artist has worked in graphic design, fine art, poster art, and video, but it is these paintings that have us excited to share with you this morning. 

Body Illusions by Chooo-San

Juxtapoz // Friday, August 30, 2013
We have shown you the body art of Chooo-San before on the site, but we love some of the "back" work the artist has created. Although we are a little weirded out by the dude that lives in the girl's back, we appreciate some of the simpler works like you see here. 

Shinsekai's 'The New World Transparent Specimens'

Juxtapoz // Thursday, August 29, 2013
Shinsekai's 'The New World Transparent Specimens' are tiny, usually aquatic life forms like fish and seahorses that are put through a process of chemical replacement of the proteins and dyeing of the bones. The result is a transparent creature that glows in eerie vibrant colors. The creatures are then sealed in vials filled with glycerin and preservatives. The specimens can be found in shops around Japan.

Installations by Risa Fukui

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, August 28, 2013
Japanese artist Risa Fukui creates large-scale paper cutouts also known as kirie and hangs them on translucent panels. The intricately cut double-sided pieces cast beautiful shadows on the floor and are on display at the Pola Museum Annex in Tokyo until September 8, 2013. 

Midori Yamada's Strange Seascapes

Illustration // Monday, August 26, 2013
Midori Yamada's whimsical depictions of lithe young girls caressing the scales and tongues of sometimes fearsome looking giant fish are delicately rendered using a combination of watercolors, pens, coffee, and acrylic paint. The artist's fanciful visions seem to take place in some strange space between land and sea, where awesome deep sea fish and tamer freshwater koi live in harmony with gentle schoolgirls. Yamada's fine lines and pale colors lend an extra dash of playfulness and levity to her already fantastic illustrations.

Shohei Otomo's Delinquents

Illustration // Monday, August 26, 2013
Son of the legendary Katsuhiro Otomo, creator of the acclaimed manga and film AKIRA, Shohei Otomo firmly holds his own as a world-class illustrator, creating technically subtle and culturally insightful works that reveal the superficiality of Japan's commercial world and the anarchic attitude of its thriving underbelly. Through his ballpoint pen depictions of "furyo," or Japanese delinquents, Otomo combines traditional motifs with a detached punk conceit, portraying scenes of violence and vulgarity in a unique fusion of realism, manga, and graphic design.

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