Shinsekai's 'The New World Transparent Specimens'

Juxtapoz // Monday, September 21, 2015
Shinsekai's 'The New World Transparent Specimens' are tiny, usually aquatic life forms like fish and seahorses that are put through a process of chemical replacement of the proteins and dyeing of the bones. The result is a transparent creature that glows in eerie vibrant colors. The creatures are then sealed in vials filled with glycerin and preservatives.

The Work of Masumi Sakamoto

Juxtapoz // Friday, September 04, 2015
Osaka-born artist Masumi Sakamoto eliminates extra background in her paintings to emphasize the characteristics of the figures, striving to explore what lays beneath the skin. Posed like fashion models and pop stars, the androgynous children in her paintings are like the characters in fairy tales: far from reality. With her optimistic expressions, Sakamoto covers tough situations in modern society with beautiful colors and thoughtful compositions. We look forward to more work from this promising young artist.

A Smartphone-Controlled Crystal Universe

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, September 02, 2015
The latest project by Japan's TeamLab allows you to walk through an LED illuminated universe and controll it with your smartphone. “The Viewer of the art work can enter and walk around in the three-dimensional light space,” says TeamLab. “When the viewer enters the space they will cause a change that will affect the lights in the entire space, and that change will continue to cause change indefinitely.” In other words, it’s like Aristotle’s theory of causation meets TeamLab’s manipulation of digital lighting. “While the light continues to change across the entire universe space, the universe that the viewer causes change in will constantly be created with the viewer at its center.”

Teamlab Transforms Aquarium with Floral Projections

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, August 11, 2015
If you've ever wondered what scuba diving on acid might be like, venture no further than the Enoshima Aquarium in Kanagawa, Japan where teamlab has created an installation which projects botanical forms, leaves, and petals swirling across one of the main tanks, "blooming and collapsing in response to the passing fish."

Canvassing the World With Takehiro Tobinaga in Kumano

Juxtapoz // Friday, July 24, 2015
Our friends at Complex have been continuing with their Summer Vacation series with Adobe, visiting creatives all over the world. In the latest episode they link up with Tokyo-based artist Takehiro Tobinaga. Tobinaga had traded in the fast-paced city life for a deep dive into rural Japan. Capturing elements from the temple, the forests, waterfalls, food, even the small, Tobinaga blended these elements to create something beautiful using Adobe Creative Cloud.

Meticulously Embroidered Temari Balls from Japan

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 23, 2015
Temari balls are a handball that originated in China, and were introduced to Japan in the 7th century. The balls were originally toys, made from old scraps of kimono, but their creation has evolved into an elaborate folk craft. This series was created in Japan by a 92-year-old woman, the images made public by her granddaughter, NanaAkua, who updates her flickr account with her grandmother's creations. Her grandmother has crafted more than 500 temari balls

Sculptures by Takeshi Haguri

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, July 21, 2015
Takeshi Haguri was born 1957 in Nagoya, Japan. After graduating the Sculpture course at the Aichi University of the Arts in 1982, he moved on to a postgraduate course, graduating in 1984. Since then he has been sculpting in wood mainly, using aluminium for outdoor works.

Paintings by Japan's Ai Shinohara

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, June 30, 2015
We are revisiting the dreamy, surreal universe of Kagoshima, Japan's Ai Shinohara, works that show the uncomfortable relationship between humans and nature. Beautiful results ensue with a few new paintings from the artist, we're hoping for more!

Update: The Work of Tenmyouya Hisashi

Juxtapoz // Monday, June 15, 2015
Tokyo-based artist Tenmyouya Hisashi began his career as a contemporary artist after working as an art director at a record label. He calls his work 'Neo Nihonga,' meaning Neo Japanese Painting. This comes from his bringing together of traditional Japanese art with Western learning and Hip-Hop influences.

Nakamura Hiroshi's 1950s Protest Art

Juxtapoz // Monday, June 01, 2015
Born in 1932, Nakamura Hiroshi was trained by the Japan Art Alliance as a reportage painter. The Alliance was 'a postwar art group that advocated politically-themed realist painting.' By the 50s, Hiroshi was very involved in depicting protests against the rise of U.S. military bases. He saw himself as a 'reporter at the frontlines' of confrontations, brandishing sketchbook and pencil as opposed to a camera.
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