Aryz, January 2013

Vault // Tuesday, March 05, 2013
Very few artists over the past five years have generated collective attention more than the young Spanish muralist and fine artist, Aryz. There’s no envy, nor pretention, but artists around the world speak of Aryz in a way that is rare in contemporary art; everyone just wants to see what he will do next. with the unassailable fact that Aryz has taken this movement, he and I agreed this interview should be comfortably labeled “contemporary muralism,” given it’s a novel perspective of comic book characteristics and detailed texture rarely seen on six stories of concrete.  

Mike Shine, March 2013

Vault // Tuesday, March 05, 2013
It’s 1970 and a Seven-year old boy happens upon a weird Russian clown at a carnival. Weird Clown grants Boy the life of his dreams. Boy signs the deal in blood. Weird Clown erases the bargain from Boy’s mind. But Weird Clown makes good on it; Boy unwittingly lives the dream life, as agreed. Fast forward forty years, we find that the boy is an artist who has become renowned for creating elaborate installations and performances about a mysterious Russian clown. The subconscious mind is a powerful thing, isn’t it? For the boy has subliminally recalled the carnival meeting, the bargain, even the clown’s correct name: Dr. Pyotr Mastolf Ilyas. Or “Flotsam,” for short.

Conor Harrington, December 2012

Vault // Monday, March 04, 2013
Journalists love the idea of making lists, and “Best Of” and “Man of the Year” picks. I’m not sure if we like to do this because it magnifies our positions as cultural arbiters, but as far as year end issues go, there will be plenty of publications and journalists making their play to define 2012. I personally don’t make lists, but I like to look at a calendar year and see who has contributed a body of work that can define, explain, and embody contemporary art at that given moment.  

Ron English, November 2012

Vault // Monday, March 04, 2013
What can I do to change the world? I’m no folk singer! (paraphrased from Bill Maher)  

Alex Pardee, October 2012

Vault // Monday, March 04, 2013
“What inspires you?” I fucking hate that question. But I’ll get back to that in a moment.  

Daniel Clowes, September 2012

Vault // Monday, March 04, 2013
Daniel Clowes is a one-man comics institution. From his early work for Cracked Magazine, to his long-running, alternative comic book series, Eightball, which spawned feature films and graphic novels, Clowes has always been a prolific pioneer in style and approach.  

Evan Hecox, August 2012

Vault // Monday, March 04, 2013
There is a duality in the work of Evan Hecox. Each piece of art is instantly recognizable as his, from skate graphics to fine art pieces, there is a command of style unlike any artists I can recall. Secondly, the viewer recognizes a location and history in the paintings—his street corner signage—the storefronts are abstract but familiar.  

Joram Roukes, April 2013

Vault // Tuesday, March 12, 2013
Creating pieces both intimidating and inventive, 29-year old Dutch painter, Joram Roukes works out of the small town of Groningen in northern Netherlands. With airy layers and dream-like surrealist landscapes, Roukes’ stream-of-consciousness style creates multiple layers of content as well as medium. Fluidly designed, elements of Roukes’ creatures and narratives extrude and protrude from one another. “I am engaged in what the viewer will see and think. I think the paintings steer but not dictate. That is what I like to do, to confuse, allowing the viewer to express or project their point of view on what they see.”

Black Dynamite, July 2012

Vault // Sunday, July 01, 2012
Black Dynamite has been slowly infiltrating his way into all forms of media ever since Michael Jai White first conceived the character in 2006. After a critically acclaimed film in 2009, the Black Dynamite team joined up with Carl Jones to take Dynamite into television.

Don Pendleton, June 2012

Vault // Friday, June 01, 2012
In the approximately 35 years of modern skateboarding, the importance of the artwork adorning the bottom of the boards themselves cannot be overstated. A mash-up of personal expression, corporate branding, propagandic conveyance, and sometimes, even true fine art at their best, they can express many of the seemingly schizophrenic facets of the skateboard world for which they speak.
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