Brian Kane's "Healing Tool" Billboard Projects

Street Art // Wednesday, July 29, 2015
Healing Tool is art designed for people in cars. A temporary public art installation using digital billboards on interstate freeways. The goal is to provide a moment of temporary relief and unexpected beauty during the daily grind of commuting. The piece builds on a body of work which simulates digital experiences in the real world. In this case, simulating the Photoshop Healing Tool to replace or patch over the landscape which is blocked by the billboard.

A Giant Sculptural Steel Labryinth

Design // Monday, July 27, 2015
Well, this is one of the coolest mazes we've ever seen. Belgian studio Gijs Van Vaerenbergh, a collaborative team of Belgian architects and artists, has designed and constructed a massive labyrinth in the central square of a former coal mine in Genk, Belgium. The sculpture uses 186 tons of steel and consists of a kilometer maze of corridors with walls as high as 5 meters. 

Jonathan Moore's "Artificial Killing Machine" Installation

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 22, 2015
In his installation Artificial Killing Machine, Jonathan Fletcher Moore takes a dry statistic—the number of deaths of individuals from drone strikes—and makes it tangible. The mechanical installation uses the public database on United States military drone strikes—information collected and vetted by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism—to feed the sculpture, which is made up of independently firing cap guns. 

Lucien Shapiro "Full Circle" @ RVCA VASF Gallery

Juxtapoz // Friday, July 17, 2015
Our friend and artist Lucien Shaprio (featured December, 2015) will be revealing his windown installation at RVCA SF this evening, Friday, July 17th with a live performance with Minka Sicklinger. The Full Circle windown installation and ritual performance will take place at 8:30pm.

Creatures Made From Old VHS Tapes

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 09, 2015
Night forbade by a sunray. Not a bird to be heard, not a herd of grass to clench, no vengeful sun to pray. Mysterious, mesmerizing, onilyrical, the V monoliths, somber giants built by Phillip Ob Rey, shaped as monsters of calm flesh limbs, carved into the lumps of the subterranean, revolve around calm crepuscular sceneries, lunar horizons of a frostbitten Iceland, and question the depths of our unconscious on the After, future of the human race.

Dennis McNett's The Serpent of Sheboygan

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 09, 2015
Thousands of years after the flames of Ragnarok had burned over the earth and the smoke from the fires blocked the sun from warming the planet, there came a great age of ice. Energies and information of the great gods and giants were scattered and lost across mountains, seas, winds and giant glaciers.

Everything is Fucked: The Work of Paul Yore

Erotica // Tuesday, July 07, 2015
Australian artist Paul Yore is familiar with controversy. His work over the years has been met with intense discussions about censorship and artistic freedom. His art has been seized by police and he has had to defend himself against criminal charges. His work has been described as a "dystopian, fastidiously constructed world drenched in psychedelic color and engaging provactively with issues of gay politics, gender, environmental destructions and capitalist critique."

More Anamorphic Installations by Bernard Pras

Juxtapoz // Monday, July 06, 2015
We posted anamorphic (the art of stacking objects to create a huge 3D sculpture) portrait installations by Bernard Pras before. The artist fills an entire room with found objects, creating a portrait. This morning we take a look at more of the French artist's impressive large-scale compositions. 

Drew Leshko’s Paper Architecture

Design // Monday, June 22, 2015
Philly artist Drew Leshko creates paper-based sculptures of the places we inhabit—apartment buildings, campers, houses, and home-made structures, as well as newsstands, dumpsters and more. The detail on these pieces is pretty unbelievable, especially in person, and you can currently see his solo show at the Delaware Center for Contemporary Art, and in the “LAX/DTW” group show coordinated by Thinkspace Gallery and exhibited at Inner State Gallery in Detroit.

June Lee's Bystander

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, June 09, 2015
Korean artist June Lee's work is based on the social phenomena of the bystander, what she calls the "Bystander Effect." "Countless things Countless things that happen quietly in our society are cases of bystander effect that make select individuals into outcasts. Thinking how I can become a social outcast due to the distant indifferent bystanders, I find this a serious problem that can’t be overlooked in silence.
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