Jay Nelson & The Everywhere Treehouse

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 30, 2015
Ten years ago, my perception of the potential of a retail shopping experience was forever skewed when I strolled into the newly opened Mollusk Surf Shop, located in the Outer Sunset neighborhood of San Francisco. Well-curated products, art adorning the walls, navigable layout, basically the whole package was thoughtfully executed. However, the undeniable jewel in the space was the stylish treehouse occupying an entire corner of the store. Unlike your stereotypical treehouse, this particular montage was fabricated with attitude and stylish funk.

Josh Keyes: The Artist in Evolution

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, July 28, 2015
Keyes has always created work with almost apocalyptic visions of a world abandoned, where humans have left behind materialistic remnants of civilization. But recently, his life and art have markedly evolved. In almost striking similarities with his work, he has become rooted in the Pacific Northwest, with the lush environment now on each canvas. Gone are the dioramas, the signature white-background pieces that famously identified him; enter a more personal style, darker, and oddly, paintings suffused with humanity.

In the Magazine: Chuck D of Public Enemy, the Earthist

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 23, 2015
First thing you notice when speaking with Chuck D is that voice. It has the command of someone who has spent over 30 years as one of the most important MCs and intellectuals, not only on the subject of hip-hop, but of music and culture as a whole. Leader of the seminal musical force and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame group Public Enemy, Chuck is also an accomplished artist who earned his degree in graphic design at Adelphi University and became one of the originators of fusing logo work and art into hip-hop.  

In the Magazine: The WPA and How the Federal Arts Project Changed American Art

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 16, 2015
Nature is an unruly place, forever getting in humanity’s way, regularly tamed but regressing back to the feral. As an aesthetic paradigm we admire its majesty, take pleasure in its picturesque and swoon at its beauty, but as a psychological fact, let’s face it; unless you’re Paul Bunyan, Daniel Boone or Johnny Appleseed it can quite rightly scare the shit out of you. And into this wilderness of overgrowth and undergrowth, impossibly daunting scale, tempestuous elements, natural predators and truly rugged discomforts... 

Beyond the Cover: Mary Iverson

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 16, 2015
Mary Iverson is an exquisite landscape painter with a razor-sharp contemporary edge. On the surface, we see activism, her collages and paintings warning us of a dystopic future existence. But the truth is, this apocalypse is happening now. Through her paintings of rogue shipping containers invading precious, untouched vistas, she uncovers the gross excess and collateral damages of the shipping industry, and ultimately, commercialism.

Juxtapoz Presents: Tom Killion's Woodcut Printmaking

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Northern California is home to some of the world’s most gorgeous landscapes. From the Sierra to the Ocean, to mountains that touch the Pacific, the ethereal beauty is a work of art itself. For over 40 years, Tom Killion has delicately archived the environmental majesty of California within the traditional process of Japanese-Style woodblock printmaking, creating stunning, colorful works through a handmade, ancient operation. We visited Tom at his Point Reyes studio to experience the comfort of a beginner’s state of mind.

In the Magazine: FAILE @ Brooklyn Museum

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 08, 2015
There are two pivotal moments in FAILE’s career that stand out from the rest. The Times Square mural painted in 2013 was a reminder of the majestic size and overall collage aesthetic style their work can capture at its fullest, and the extent by which street art can be its most pop-centric. And, of course, Les Ballets de Faile installation at the New York City Ballet in 2013, a piece of art that was a literal monument connecting urban imagery with the high performance art that is the ballet. These two extremes perfectly define what FAILE is and has become; a balance between both outdoor and indoor presentations that reimagine the space they inhabit in a way that magnifies their art.

Jim Phillips: The Screaming Hand Is Still Making Noise

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, July 07, 2015
I’m often asked where I got the idea for the Screaming Hand… like I had a store where I could get images. Sometimes an idea just pops in my mind, and I’ve trained myself to be receptive. Screaming Hand dates back to high school where I liked to spend my time drawing epic surfing and skateboard pictures and give them to my friends...

In the Magazine: Jay Howell & Jim Dirschberger

Juxtapoz // Monday, June 29, 2015
Creating an animated television series for Nickelodeon would seem to be a dream endeavor for any artist, and from what I gathered spending the day at the Nickelodeon Animation Studio with Sanjay and Craig creators, Jay Howell and Jim Dirschberger, it is as much fun as it looks. Jay and Jim have developed a special relationship, one that stretches beyond creative collaboration and into the friendship that is at the heart of their show...

In the Magazine: Ben Venom

Juxtapoz // Friday, June 19, 2015
Ben Venom is a badass quilter. I had the opportunity to visit his studio in San Francisco’s Haight Ashbury and see his fine German threads, boxes of old leather jackets, and mountains of used jeans and T-shirts used to craft these massive quilts. Full of occult symbology, each one could be a cozy centerpiece for a satanic ritual. Venom earned his nickname as a teenager, and he is a self-taught, one-man show with a standard sewing machine, whose upcycled art represents his community and his subcultural interests...
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