Paintings by Winston Chmielinski

Juxtapoz // Monday, February 04, 2013
An admission—that I am a disorganized, impulsive person—reads more optimistically on canvas because the eye has glimpsed the edge. Therefore I paint, subjectively and impatiently, colliding impressions of points with interpretations of space (the accidentals are debris) so that the composition hangs, almost magically, in mid-air.

Sascha Braunig "Wrister, Blister, Plaster" @ Foxy Productions, New York

Juxtapoz // Saturday, January 26, 2013
Sascha Braunig's current solo show at Foxy Productions in New York will be on view until February 9th. This recent body of gouache and oil portraits combine figurative painting with op art that is worth a visit if either of these genres are of particular interest. This isn't the first time we have been mesmerized by these works this month...

"In the Shadow of Tomorrow: Neo-realism in the Netherlands" @ MMKA, Arnhem

Juxtapoz // Saturday, January 26, 2013
And in here we find the roots of much of the early Juxtapoz movements. What an amazing looking show going on in the Netherlands at the Museum of Modern Art Arnhem. In the Shadow of Tomorrow: Neo-realism in the Netherlands features an incredible group of works of early neo-realists working before World War II, all working under the guise of a threat of another massive, Europe altering war on the horizon.

The Works of Alberto Ybarra

Juxtapoz // Thursday, January 24, 2013
My art is about life experiences, difficult moments, powerful emotions and thought provoking taboo ideas. Most of my paintings are figurative narratives, which explore sexuality, spirituality and human interaction. Art is a language. Painting is my primary language and it’s the best way I am able to communicate a story. It matters little if what is portrayed is true, only that the final piece is an extension of myself, my experience and unique outlook.

The Works Lukasz Wodynski

Juxtapoz // Monday, January 14, 2013
The works of Lukasz Wodynski are a a combination of the polemicizing process which every living creature undergoes. Wodynski is interested in the horizontal system of the axis of birth, life, death and defecation of a human organism.

The Works of Valentin van der Meulen

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, January 08, 2013
The work of French artist Valentin van der Meulen has recently caught our eye. His blurred and torn paintings are full of emotion and tension that transport the viewer to a dark place. Recently, Meulen did a collaboration with fellow French artist David Mesguich. The collaborative piece, seen in the gallery, features a 3-headed geometric sculpture, reveals a new dimension to Meulen's already impresssive work.

Oil Paintings by Sascha Braunig

Juxtapoz // Friday, January 04, 2013
SASCHA BRAUNIG combines vibrant color and an hypnotic style in works that reflect upon illusion and the surface of the image. In dream-like scenes where repetition and patterning are foregrounded, Braunig's female subjects emit an extrasensory glow. Flaring with reflected color, they are iridescent beings whose very skin seems to be a source of psychic power. —Foxy Production

The Works of Chad Wys

Juxtapoz // Monday, December 31, 2012
Illinois native Chad Wys' has continued his deconstructive assault on the art world. Using a variety of mixed media elements, Wy's has focused on creating a series of ready made objects that are based on objectivity and ownership. In doing so, he often explores and exploits the idea of object-hood: how we decorate our lives with arbitrary, as well as meaningful, things...

Geoffrey Chadsey: Men

Juxtapoz // Monday, December 31, 2012
“Resolutely unglamorous, Chadsey's young men, no hunks, preen and pose, sometimes grotesquely transformed by superimpositions that seem to be materialized projections of their fantasies…. These drawings in water-soluble colored pencil on mylar are skillfully delineated, visually powerful, and, even these days, disturbing and provocative.” As stated by DeWitt Chang of the Huffington Post

Melissa Cooke

Juxtapoz // Thursday, December 20, 2012
Melissa Cooke's drawings are made by dusting thin layers of graphite onto paper with a dry brush. The softness of the graphite provides a smooth surface that can be augmented by erasing in details and textures. No pencils are used in the work, allowing the surface to glow without the shine of heavy pencil marks. Illusion dissolves into brush work and the honesty of the material...

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