Jamie Hawkesworth Photographs Ai Weiwei

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Ai Weiwei is undeniably one of the most significant and heroically provocative artists in China (and in the world for that matter) right now. If you are not familiar with why we would say such a thing, you certainly should go see Never Sorry. Recently, photographer Jamie Hawkesworth was sent to capture some images of his studio in Beijing for AnOther Magazine, and the results were stunning. Each composition is clean, simple, and telling of Ai Weiwei's circumstances.

Traditional Chinese Style Landfills by Yao Lu

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Chinese photographer Yao Lu takes images of garbage draped in protective netting and manipulates them to resemble the beautiful misty mountainous landscapes so often depicted by tradition Chinese landscape paintings. Entitled New Landscapes, the series comments on the not so hidden environmental impacts of China's expansive urbanization.  

"Hiding in the City," New Photographs by Liu Bolin

Juxtapoz // Saturday, February 16, 2013
Master invisible man and internationally celebrated photo-performance Chinese artist Liu Bolin has several new pieces that are part of a retrospective at Galerie Paris-Beijing.

Flexible Paper Sculptures by Li Hongbo

Juxtapoz // Thursday, February 07, 2013
Why carve your sculptures when you could delicately glue thousands of perfectly cut pieces of paper together? Beijing editor and designer Li Hongbo, inspired by tradtional Chinese paper toys and decorations, applied the same methods to create these very cool, flexible paper sculptures. Watch the video below of Hongbo demonstrating his sculptures at a recent solo show at Dominik Mersche Gallery in Australia.

Reflection by Cai Guo-Qiang

Juxtapoz // Saturday, January 26, 2013
Chinese artist, Cai Guo-Qiang, explores how past and present artistic expression is driven by contact between cultures and peoples lack of social identity and cultural expression. The site-specific installation entitled Reflection consists of a 50-foot-long skeleton of a sunken Japanese fishing boat resting upon an imaginary beach of gleaming broken white blanc de chine porcelain fragments of deities from Dehua, China.

LED Ice Slides in China

Juxtapoz // Friday, January 11, 2013
This is epic. As part of the Harbin Ice Festival in China, visitors can partake in the time-honored pastime of LED lit ice sliding. There are a couple things at play here that should be noted. One, you are sliding from an ice castle, and two, you have to slide at night for the full light effect. China, here we come.

The Works of Shanghai's Mojo Wang

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, January 02, 2013
Our favorite pieces from the Shanghai, China-based Mojo Wang are the ones that do not feature faces. His newest work, People Mountain, People Se, feature grayscaled characters, no faces, saluting and communicating in unison. Maybe the theme of anonymity will carry us through 2013?

A Chair With Guts

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, December 11, 2012
This makes our stomachs feel a little queasy, but we truly appreciate the digusting, fascinating, and creepy chair with resin guts by Chinese artist, Cao Hui. We appreciate the chair and the artist's statement: "In order to deceive others, we explain with theory after theory, but it all ends in laughter and sometimes we even amuse ourselves before god laughs."

Takashi Murakami "Flowers & Skulls" @ Gagosian Gallery, Hong Kong

Juxtapoz // Thursday, November 29, 2012
This is one we wish we could head to Hong Kong for, Takashi Murakami's first show in Hong Kong at Gagosian Gallery. This exhibition explores one of the central dichotomies of his art—between joy and terror, his optimistic magnanimity as an artist and his pessimistic perspective on postwar Japan. It opens/opened tonight, November 29, in Hong Kong.

The House that would not Budge

Juxtapoz // Sunday, November 25, 2012
This isn't so much an art story so much as it is just a plain awesome story. Luo Baogen and his wife refused to leave their home in Wenling, Zhejiang, China because they felt that the government's relocation compensation was not enough for them to rebuild a new home. So instead, they stayed put and made the government build a road around their 5-story home.

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