Guo Fengyi’s Mystic Visions

Illustration // Tuesday, November 10, 2015
Self-trained artist Guo Fengyi drew based on her spiritual visions.

Landfills in the Style of Traditional Chinese Landscapes by Yao Lu

Juxtapoz // Friday, October 02, 2015
Chinese photographer Yao Lu takes images of garbage draped in protective netting and manipulates them to resemble the beautiful misty mountainous landscapes so often depicted by tradition Chinese landscape paintings. Entitled New Landscapes, the series comments on the not so hidden environmental impacts of China's expansive urbanization.

Sculptures by Zhang Huan

Juxtapoz // Monday, September 28, 2015
Chinese artist Zhang Huan has become well known for his performance art as well as his sculptural works. This morning we take a look through a collection of some of his sculptures including this 2011 piece titled Q Confucius No.2, a 'massive silica-gel, mechanical bust of an unclothed Confucius rests in a rectangular pool.' The sculpture's breast rises and falls as if the object were breathing!

Drawings by Qiu Jie

Juxtapoz // Friday, August 21, 2015
Qiu Jie trained both in Chinese high-realism and European multi-media schools, also working professionally as a decorator and designer. His drawings are informed from a wide range of aesthetic influences and carry a sense of myth making, exotica, and expedition through mysterious terrains of the imagination.

Cai Guo Qiang's Flaming Sky Ladder

Juxtapoz // Thursday, August 13, 2015
Despite all life’s twists and turns, I have always been determined to realize it. My earlier proposals were either more abstract or ceremonial. Sky Ladder today is tender, and touches my heart deeply: it carries affection for my hometown, my relatives and my friends. In contrast to my other attempts, which set the ignition time at dusk, this time the ladder rose toward the morning sun, carrying hope. For me, this not only means a return but also the start of a new journey.

A Hyperreal Fallen Angel Sculpture

Juxtapoz // Monday, August 03, 2015
Chinese artists Sun Yuan and Peng Yu have created a hyperreal sculpture of a fallen angel using fiberglass, woven mesh, and stainless steel. Initially constructed in 2008, the piece was installed in Beijing earlier last week. The duo previously has been featured on the site for their impressive hyperreal sculpture installations and have made headlines for using controversial materials like human fat tisue and real cadavers in their work.

Palais de Tokyo Presents Contentious Chinese Artist Tianzhuo Chen

Juxtapoz // Monday, August 03, 2015
Palais de Tokyo presents the very first solo exhibition in France of Chinese young artist Tianzhuo Chen (born 1985, lives and works in Beijing, China).Tianzhuo Chen uses a colourful, grotesque and kitsch imagery, dominated by direct references to drugs, LGBT hip hop, the London rave scene, Japanese Butoh, voguing in New York and the fashion world, to forge an intimate connection between his works and the collapse of moral attitudes and beliefs we see around us.

China Copies Entire Austrian Town of Hallstatt

Design // Friday, July 31, 2015
We’ve posted on China’s replica cities—cities whose architecture mimics those of European towns. Recently, China’s Minmetals Land Limited, a real estate development company, created a replica of Hallstatt, an Austrian town. The town is an exact clone and in China is a high-end development, in Huizhou, a city 60 miles northeast of Hong Kong. The project cost $940 million to build and opened to residents in 2012.

Nature's Revenge: A Fishing Village in China Reclaimed

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, June 16, 2015
This isn't so much an art update as it is just a cool sight. Near the Yangtze River off the eastern coast of China, a small fishing village has been reclaimed by nature, sort of a Josh Keyes-ian but in real-life scenario happening as we speak. From MyModernMet, "Once a thriving settlement merely half a century ago, Houtou Wan Village was gradually deserted when the small bay could no longer meet the needs of the increasing number of fishing boats."

Watch: "An Emo Nose" by Wong Ping

Juxtapoz // Monday, June 08, 2015
Chinese animator Wong Ping has one of the most wonderfully bizarre imaginations we've encountered. Where his ideas come from we don't know, but we love his animations and always look forward to seeing more. This latest one, called "An Emo Nose," explores his loneliness after his nose tragically decides to leave him. As a result of his nose being gone he loses interest in any kind of social activity and actually starts to enjoy the loneliness as he observes the ugliness of people around him. 
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