Gunpowder drawings by Cai Guo-Qiang

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, August 19, 2014
We recently featured Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang and his solo exhibition The Ninth Wave with a boatload of 99 fabricated animals on the Huangpu River. On August 8th the show opened with a bang – quite literally. His other pieces are an explosive series of gunpowder drawings titled Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter. Each representing a season, they are porcelain reliefs decorated with gunpowder then ignited at an event by Cai, which created a large gathering of spectators. A contemporary take on traditional Chinese motifs, beautiful details of nature emerged from the explosions and smoke highlighting delicate and intricate details made by the artist and the natural process taken. 

Cai Guo-qiang: The Ninth Wave

Juxtapoz // Saturday, July 26, 2014
Cai Guo Qiang is opening a show through The Power Station of Art in Shanghai, titled The Ninth Wave from August 8th to October 26th. A monumental and impactful installation of a fishing boat from the artist’s hometown of Quanzhou carrying 99 fabricated animals down the Huangpu River. Tigers, pandas, camels and apes cover the tiers of the worn ship, appearing weathered and dreary as hunched figures in fatigue. Guo Qiang took visual inspiration from Russian painter Ivan Aivazovsky’s 1850 painting, which illustrates survivors of a terrible shipwreck, hanging on for dear life with overt expressions of weary souls who battled the woes of nature and its unforgiveable forces, blatantly communicating human helplessness in the wake of mother earth’s blows.

Cai Guo Qiang's "Falling Back to Earth" @ Queensland GOMA

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, November 27, 2013
Consisting of 99 replicas of wild animals circled around a water pool in one of three major installations by Chinese artist Cai Guo Qiang at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art in Australia. "Falling Back to Earth" features this centerpiece installation along with two other including the striking "Head On2006," featuring 99 wolves leaping into a glass wall!

Reflection by Cai Guo-Qiang

Juxtapoz // Saturday, January 26, 2013
Chinese artist, Cai Guo-Qiang, explores how past and present artistic expression is driven by contact between cultures and peoples lack of social identity and cultural expression. The site-specific installation entitled Reflection consists of a 50-foot-long skeleton of a sunken Japanese fishing boat resting upon an imaginary beach of gleaming broken white blanc de chine porcelain fragments of deities from Dehua, China.

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