Divine Inquiry by Michelle Anderst

Illustration // Monday, July 29, 2013
Michelle Anderst is a Seattle-based fine artist whose paintings of biological structures serve as both works of art as well as aesthetic statements on ecological consciousness in the modern world. Through her use of vibrant colors and organic subject matter, such as bone, stem, and vein, Anderst creates unique microcosms of the greater natural world, illustrating the interdependence of all living things with one another, no matter how seemingly small or distantly related. 

Alma Haser's Cosmic Surgery

Illustration // Monday, July 29, 2013
London-based artist Alma Haser's series "Cosmic Surgery" combines the traditional conceit of the self-portrait with the meditative art of origami to create other-worldly portraits that almost seem to come from another time and place in the universe. To create this effect, Haser photographs her sitter then prints multiple images of the subject's face, folding each image into a complicated origami structure. She then rephotographs the portrait with the origami placed on the sitter's face. The resulting photograph is both unsettling and intriguing, like a glimpse into a possible evolutionary path for humanity or a window to a far-off alien species. 

Pop Anatomy by Antoni Tudisco

Illustration // Monday, July 29, 2013
Self-taught artist Antoni Tudisco may be only 21 years old, but his facility and artistry belie his young age, showing an extraordinary capacity for craftsmanship and innovation. Having mastered the Adobe Suite and 3D illustration entirely on his own, Tudisco has been sought after by major companies such as MTV, Coca-Cola, Louis Vuitton, and Nestle for his intricate and sleek digital work. Skulls and organs feature heavily in his illustrations, lending an almost clinical detachment to his otherwise chaotic pieces, in turn grounding them in a contemporary style that is very current and in demand in the mainstream pop art scene.

Harvey Moon's Drawing Machines

Illustration // Monday, July 29, 2013
Even for the most accomplished artist, translating the images of the mind to physical form is often the most daunting and difficult part of the creative process. Add to that the practice of collaboration, where two minds must meet and intimately connect, creating art can seem a formidable task. Yet new media artists such as Harvey Moon are pushing conceptions of creation, collaboration, and artistic license to new extremes, where through designing, building, and programming machines to draw in place of the human hand, Moon both works in concert with and relinquishes control to his mechanical collaborator, a drawing robot. 

Pharaonic Profiles by Laura Hines

Illustration // Monday, July 22, 2013
Based in Tucson, AZ, Laura Hines is an illustrator with a background in natural science illustration and a fascination for all things macabre and cadaverous, in particular the royal mummies of ancient Egypt. Their presence in the modern world affords an intimate human link to the mysterious past, as well as the ability to look upon their features and see parts of ourselves in their reposed expressions. From the leathery surface of the skin to the most delicate stroke of a still extant eyelash, Hines portrays these cherished archeological relics as individual people, each projecting a unique spirit and prevailing vitality never lost through the ages.

Self-Dissections by Danny Quirk

Illustration // Monday, July 22, 2013
Massachusetts-based artist Danny Quirk specializes in photo realistic watercolors of anatomical structures, painting what cameras cannot capture with quite as much precision and delicacy as the artist's hand. Quirk's work combines classic poses in dramatic chiaroscuro lighting with a contemporary twist, creating portraits of self-discovery through dissection. This intimate uncovering of the structures that lay beneath the skin mirrors humanity's quest for self-understanding, whether in an emotional, spiritual, or physical sense. 

Stardust by Sergio Albiac

Illustration // Monday, July 22, 2013
Sergio Albiac is a visual artist based in Barcelona, Spain, whose process of production involves writing computer programs to generate complex images of beauty and emotion. In his latest artist foray into "generative portraiture," Albiac employs the concept of nucleosynthesis, essentially the cosmic creation of stardust, to compose automated collage portraits that source photographs from The Hubble Space Telescope. The resulting images are not only universally appealling as works of abstracted beauty, but also representative of our place in the cosmos as material beings essentially made of star stuff.

Lin Xue's Organic Meditations

Illustration // Monday, July 22, 2013
It's a true visual feast to study the fine lines and curving shapes of  Hong Kong-based artist Lin Xue's intricate and contemplative work. Intuitively created after long sojourns into the mountains of China, Xue's tools of choice reflect the raw, elemental contents of his drawings; sharpened shards of bamboo dipped in pools of ink depict the most basic structures of life in a thriving ecosystem, interpreted on paper through a dreamlike veil of almost otherworldly beauty. The self-taught artist has always been drawn to the "orchestral energy" of the natural world, attempting to recreate its resonating vibrations through the meditative process of his art.

Higgs Boson Mural by Josef Kristofoletti

Illustration // Monday, July 15, 2013
This impressive time-lapse video presents the painstaking work undertaken by international artist Josef Kristofoletti to create a three story tall mural for the ATLAS Experiment at CERN, or the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Collaborating closely on location with CERN physicists, over the course of a year Kristofoletti developed a project that visually interpreted what the Higgs boson might possibly look like. The result is an astonishing mural that captures the spirit of inquiry present in and essential to the pursuit of science and the artistic process.

Irene Shkarovska's Lovely Osteology

Illustration // Monday, July 15, 2013
Ukrainian graphic designer and illustrator Irene Shkarovska has created some exceedingly beautiful and stylish illustrations for an anatomical book on osteology, or the scientific study of bones. Her delicate linework and use of faded colors elevates these pieces from detached scientific views of human bone to visually exquisite interpretations of our skeletal structures. Shkarovska's creations follow in a long line of science art that serves both its objective purpose as well as appeals to the creative eye and sense of aesthetic pleasure, mirroring the sensation of awe and wonder that motivates all scientific thought and progress.
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