The Caretaker by Amir H. Fallah

Juxtapoz // Friday, July 10, 2015
Amir H. Fallah makes portraits that have nothing to do with the way an individual looks. After choosing a subject—a friend, acquaintance, or, in the case of his Nerman exhibit, someone who was a complete stranger when he began, Fallah excavates the person’s life. He visits the home, taking in furniture and décor and combing through the possessions, mementos and other treasures that speak to the values and relationships that define the inner self. Given the billion-dollar industry that serves people’s concern with how they present their outer selves, it’s a subversive approach, made all the more so by Fallah’s practice of covering his subjects in fabric, drapery, or other materials, so that we don’t see their physical features at all.

"Corrective Course" @ Marcas Contemporary Art, Santa Ana

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 03, 2014
 “Corrective Course,” the inaugural exhibit, will feature the works of 40 contemporary artists many of whom have never shown in Orange County, and one, Peruvian muralist JADE, who is showing for the first time in the United States. The show, in keeping with the vision of the gallery, will concentrate on a diverse selection of techniques and stylizations. “Corrective Course” will present an amazing cross section of trending themes in contemporary art...

March 2014 On Sale Now: Psychedelic Poster Art + more

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, February 05, 2014
All 2014 long, Juxtapoz will be looking back at our roots, celebrating our 20th year with a mixture of history and the contemporary. For the March 2014 issue, we look at how Juxtapoz was born out of 1960's Psychedelic experimentation, from the art and groundbreaking imagery created by some of San Francisco's finest poster artists...  

Amir H. Fallah "The Collected" @ Gallery Wendi Norris, SF

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, April 02, 2013
A great looking show at Wendi Norris in San Francisco, Amir H. Fallah’s “The Collected” draws inspiration from not only the subjects of Renaissance portrait and vanitas paintings, but also the economic models in which those works were produced. Commissioned portraits traditionally involve visual symbols indicating the power, influence, and sophistication of their subjects. In this first exhibition of this ongoing global project, portraits have been commissioned and thereby sold before the opening of this show, which is a business reality rooted in traditions from medieval ateliers and modern galleries alike.


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