Sara Antoinette Martin's Illustrations

Illustration // Wednesday, July 01, 2015
Sara Antoinette Martin's illustrations draw on religious imagery and betray her roots as a tattoo artist. Her pieces often resemble gothic-themed tarot cards; the illustrations are visually bright but often include images of vomit, clowns and severed fingers. 

Tina Lugo's Dark Illustrated Erotica

Erotica // Wednesday, July 01, 2015
We've posted before about Tina Lugo's illustrations—dark erotic scenes, influenced by her childhood immersion in cartoons, comics and videogames. Lugo lists as her biggest influence the Ero Guru Nansensu art movement of Japan—a name comprised of fractions of the english words erotic, grotesque, and nonsense. 

Biro Pen Illustrations by Helena Hauss

Illustration // Tuesday, June 30, 2015
Helena Hauss is a Paris-based illustrator who uses all bic pens to draw large detailed drawings. Helena strated drawing with bic pens in high school and became so accustomed to using them that she never found herself at ease with anything else. " other medium allows me to put so much emphasis and details into hair, reflects and patterns as I so much love to do."

Digital Illustration by Dhanank Pambayun

Illustration // Tuesday, June 30, 2015
Dhanank Pambayun is a digital illustrator who lives in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. He started his career in 2002, building a personal playground website which evolved into a professional illustration studio in 2007. After trying a variety of different jobs, from graphic designer to animator, he focused on digital illustrator as his occupation. Dhanank’s work is composed of complex compositions with a high level of detail. Each piece combines vintage looks, disharmony, rich color, and both surreal and grunge effects. His artwork has been featured in outstanding graphic magazines and websites, as well as in commissioned work for major brands.

An Update with Mrzyk and Moriceau

Erotica // Tuesday, June 23, 2015
We have been long-time fans of Petra Mrzyk and Jean-François Moriceau's illustrations. Working collaboratively since 1998, the Châtillon-sur-Indre, France-based artists are known for their "detailed black-and-white ink drawings, their work teeters on the absurd, humorous, and perverse. With an ironic nod to commercial illustration, comics, and graphic design, they pluck imagery from contemporary visual culture. In their work, anything becomes possible. Animals take on human traits; inanimate objects disturbingly come to life; and the surreal is the norm."

New Awesome Work By Federico Babina

Juxtapoz // Friday, June 19, 2015
Federico Babina is at it again! Twenty-seven imaginary houses that correlate to the best and most famous film directors, from Jim Jarmusch to Lars Von Trier. The varied styles of the directors are intrepreted as architecutral designs, creating charming images. Babina believes that it's similar with architecture details, where even the most subtle of details helps create an imprint of the creator.

Mu Pan's Illustrations of Plague and Battle

Illustration // Wednesday, June 17, 2015
We've discussed illustrator Mu Pan's work before. His dark work implies stories, not simply static images. They show dismal battles, fantastical for their participants who are often animals and imaginary creatures. 

Takumi Kama's Portraits of Schoolgirl-Animals

Illustration // Wednesday, June 17, 2015
Japanese artist Takumi Kama has used his fear of schoolgirls as inspiration for this series of portrait illustrations. The portraits depict schoolgirls in typical poses, but with animal heads and bodyparts.

Tadanori Yokoo's Psychedelia

Illustration // Thursday, June 11, 2015
Tadanori Yokoo is one of Japan's most successful and internationally recognized graphic designers and artists. He began his career as a stage designer for avant garde theatre in Tokyo. In the late 1960s he became interested in mysticism and psychedelia, deepened by travels in India. Because his work was so attuned to 1960s pop culture, he has often been (unfairly) described as the "Japanese Andy Warhol" ...

Book Reviews: Drawing People - The Human Figure In Contemporary Art

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, June 10, 2015
Undeniably, the human form fascinates. It has caught the imagination like no other subject in recorded history. In his introduction to Drawing People: The Human Figure In Contemporary Art, Roger Malbert, senior curator of Hayward Touring at the Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London and contributor to many esteemed publications, writes, “Drawings give access to the obsessions, sense of humour, emotions and fantasies of their creator...


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