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Matthew Craven at Gallery Hijinks

Illustration // Friday, 10 Feb 2012
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I stopped by Gallery Hijinks in San Francisco last weekend for the opening of Matthew Craven's solo show 'FRGMNT'. Craven's gorgeous and cohesive series of mixed media and illustration work in his new '#2 pencil' palette was a beautiful shift from his previous primary color work that i had seen in New York.

 

 

February 4th to February 25th, 2012 Opening: February 4th 2012, 6-10pm

 

Gallery Hijinks is proud to present FRGMNTS, a solo exhibition of new works by New York based artist Matthew Craven. The artist uses historical images as a backdrop for a more abstract form of storytelling. Images from lost cultures, relics and landscapes, both well known and extremely ambiguous, create the patterns within his work. These arrangements highlight shape and composition rather than historical accuracy, solidifying their participation in a completely unique myth.

 

This exhibition aims to form connections between modern life and the lives of those who came before us. FRGMNTS further explores these concepts and narratives that Matthew Craven’s previous work only hinted towards in the past. Cravens deliberate choice to exclusively source outdated textbooks for his collages create an underlying narrative and give historical context to the body of work as whole. However, the imagery within each piece is not chosen for it’s contribution to the narrative but rather for it’s singular aesthetic value.

 

Craven’s process begins with sourcing his materials, searching for hours, and sometimes even days to find the perfect books to give his work the desired foundation. The rough-dry surfaces, smell and color deterioration of the naturally aged paper create a distinctive palate. Depictions of beautiful textile, carvings and architecture find themselves inspiring the artist’s impulses. Hand drawn patterns are aesthetically connected to these works.

 

Gallery Hijinks Artist: Matthew Craven

 

Artist Statement: I use historical images as a backdrop for a more abstract form of storytelling. Images from lost cultures, relics and landscapes, both well-known and extremely ambiguous create the patterns within my work. These arrangements highlight shape and composition rather than historical accuracy, solidifying their participation in a completely unique myth.

 

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