The black and white portraiture of Gerard Wessel

Photography // Friday, April 18, 2014
Gerard Wessel is a Dutch photographer primarily known for his book of tattoo portraits. He has explored several cultures including youth and tattoos. His stark black and white images are moving and beautiful. 

America’s First Crime Scene Photographer

Photography // Friday, April 18, 2014
In the 1930’s and 40’s, a Ukrainian photographer by the name of Arthur Fellig made a living photographing crime scenes for New York City area newspapers. He gained his nickname “Weegee”from the phonetic version of the ouija board because of his seemingly clairvoyant ability to arrive at a crime scene just minutes after it occurred. 

Lee Friedlander - The Printed Picture @ Pratt Brooklyn Campus Library

Photography // Thursday, April 17, 2014
On April 30th, Pratt Institute in Brooklyn will be hosting an exhibition of books (1969–2014) and related ephemera by famed photographer Lee Freidlander. 

Charles Traub - Dolce Via: Italy in the 1980s

Photography // Thursday, April 17, 2014
Damiani is pleased to announce the release of Dolce Via: Italy in the 1980s (Damiani, March 2013), featuring a  foreword by Max Kozloff and a dialogue by Luigi Ballerini. Throughout the 1980s, Traub was a frequent visitor to Italy, and the resulting book is full of striking color photographs, shown together for the first time since the mid-1980s. 

Otto Snoek

Photography // Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Otto Snoek’s photographs are surprisingly different from many other street photographers. Perhaps this is because he keeps in tact the reality of these moments of life. There are no events or unusual things, the photographs feel very European and normative. Snoek has photographed in many situations, such as extremely extravagant exclusive parties, large public events, and drunken night gatherings but in each he maintains this subtle nature of his photography.

From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried

Photography // Wednesday, April 16, 2014
From 1995 to 1996 photographer Carrie Mae Weems created a groundbreaking body of work titled “From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried”. The series is made up of 34 appropriated images from the 19th and 20th-centuries which she reprinted using a red filter and framed under glass that had been sandblasted with overlying text. 

Deadbeat Club: Field Trip @ Seeing Things Gallery

Photography // Tuesday, April 15, 2014
This upcoming weekend, Seeing Things Gallery in San Jose will present a photography group show by Deadbeat Club entitled “Field Trip” and we think it would be wise of you to go! The show will feature the work of six photographers that include Grant Hatfield, Deanna Templeton, Ed Templeton, Clint Woodside, Devin Briggs and Nolan Hall, who were all connected through the sub-cultures of skateboarding and/or art to start making zines. 

Henri Cartier-Bresson Retrospective

Photography // Tuesday, April 15, 2014
From February to June 9, 2014 there will be a 70 year retrospective of photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson on display at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, France. Along with being an astounding documentary photographer, he also coined the term “decisive moment”in reference to what made his images so profound. 

Grisly images from Legendary photographer Enrique Metinides a.k.a. “Mexican Weegee”

Photography // Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Enrique Metinides is a Mexican photographer who documented the grislier side of life in Mexico City. He has often been referred to as the “Mexican Weegee” because of the dark subject matter and intimate access to police sites. But this label, while accurate in some ways, seems to fall short of this mans legendary documents. His compositions are well considered which make the images conflicting. 

André Kertész

Photography // Monday, April 14, 2014
Twenty-five years after his death, André Kertész (1894–1985) is today a world-famous photographer who produced images that will be familiar to everyone, but he has yet to receive full recognition for his personal contribution to the language of photography in the 20th century. His career spanning more than seventy years was chaotic, and his longevity was matched by an unwavering creative acuity that rendered difficult an immediate or retrospective understanding of his work" as stated by Jeu de Paume Gallery.
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