"IRÉEL" by Flora Borsi

Photography // Friday, July 25, 2014
In her latest series, IRÉEL, photographer Flora Borsi continues to explore photo-manipulation and conceptual photography, this time electing a more tangible approach to her experimentations. Appropriating broad, abrasive brushstrokes, Borsi creates a beautifully effacing aesthetic that refocuses the viewer’s attention, resists definition, and instead resides in a hyperrealisitc realm between acrylic portraiture and photography. 

A look inside "Paradigm Vol. 1 - Genesis"

Photography // Friday, July 25, 2014
What do Wes Lang, Noam Chomsky, Glenn O’Brien, Lance Mountain and Erik Brunetti all have in common? Nothing in particular besides being exceptionally talented in their respected fields, however they all contributed to the new independently published 343-page hardcover book, Paradigm Vol. I – Genesis. 

amy elkins's "Lucas"

Photography // Friday, July 25, 2014
Amy Elkins photographed Lucas from the time she met him at a wedding, aged 13, every three to four months since. A “longitudinal portrait”, the images quietly record changes in his face and activities. Reminiscent of rummaging through your childhood wardrobe, his shirts change from jerseys to band tees and then back to blank fabrics. 

Issei Suda: Tokyokei

Photography // Thursday, July 24, 2014
During the 1970’s and 80’s photographer Issei Suda documented the streets of Tokyo. Whilst the sidewalks are busy with a myriad of people, businesses and the hustle and bustle of a city, the streets that Suda captured are a far away vision compared to the images we see today of the modern mega-city.

Michelle Frankfurter's "Destino"

Photography // Thursday, July 24, 2014
Photographer Michelle Frankfurter’s series Destino documents the exodus of Central American train-hoppers finding their way through Mexico to the United States. This migration “…conveys the experience of a generation of exiles, driven by poverty and the dysfunction of failed states, traveling across a landscape that has become increasingly dangerous, heading towards a precarious future as a last resort”, as written on her Kickstarter site.

“Glass Eyes Staring Yonder”

Photography // Thursday, July 24, 2014
In her series “Glass Eyes Staring Yonder”, photographer Emma Kisiel explores the way in which we interact with animals through their taxidermied versions. Kisiel comments on the practice of taxidermy and the tradition of photographing taxidermy by creating images of her deceased subjects in a way that attempts to visually breath the life back into them that taxidermy was unable to achieve.

Maury Gortemiller's "Do the Priest in Different Voices".

Photography // Wednesday, July 23, 2014
Maury Gortemiller is a photographer, teacher, and competitive apneist (breath holder) living in Georgia. His series "Do the Priest in Different Voices" proves humorous in the title, for starters. But each included image begins to reveal a complex personal narrative about religion and it's related expectations.

A look inside Jim Goldberg's "Rich and Poor"

Photography // Wednesday, July 23, 2014
36 years ago Jim Goldberg took his first photograph for Rich and Poor on Mission Street in San Francisco. Looking out from his current studio windows the photographer can peer down on that exact spot where he took that initial photo. In his republished book Rich and Poor (originally published in 1985), Goldberg reflects on how little has changed other than the faces and that the living conditions are even more tenuous and hopeless than before. 

Christopher Nunn: Falling into the Day

Photography // Wednesday, July 23, 2014
Over the past five years in an on-going project, the accomplished artist David Blackburn has been the central focus of a photographic study conducted by Christopher Nunn. David is living with Alzheimer’s disease, documented here in a poignant survey of a journey that began as a simple character study and has grown to hold a far deeper emotive impact. Discussing notions of alienation, memory and loss through a subtle narrative that explores David’s condition.

Peter Kaaden's Zu Nah

Photography // Wednesday, July 23, 2014
German photographer Peter Kaaden is known for his spontaneous portraits of his friends, often naked in strange, sometimes indiscernible situations. In his new series Zu Nah featured in Vice’s 2014 photo issue, he has removed the humans but not the nudity, instead creating it out of food in a series of vulva shaped close ups of clams and sliced turkey sandwiches.
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