Facing Klone: The Address of a Voice in Tel-Aviv’s Street Art

Juxtapoz // Saturday, 08 Aug 2009
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“How do Klone’s human-alien-predators speak to us, as they unexpectedly surface on buildings, houses, walls, street corners, power boxes, doors, entryways, doorframes and windowsills, as they flicker – appearing and disappearing – on Marmorek, Yehuda Halevi, Shenkin, Lillienblum and Herzl streets; on Rothchild Boulevard, or in the Florentin and the Old Central Bus Station districts; in the Dizzengof Square area, the old Tel-Aviv Theater on Pinsker Street, in Bezalel Market and northward along Ben Yahuda Street? How should we listen to the voice of these images?”

 

[...]

 

“The act of graffiti is typically understood in terms of a struggle to make one’s voice heard in the public sphere, a confrontation with the predominant social deafness that bars the street artist from recognizing his or her voice as part of that sphere. The act of graffiti – e.g., bombing – is an attack on those 'walls of silence' that signify the exclusion of 'bombers' from legitimate spheres of expression. In this respect, the act of signing one’s name, graffiti’s ur-form, the signature appearing on a wall, a telephone booth or on a subway car, is not a mode of self-expression, but is, first and foremost, an act of self-assertion, self-positioning and thus a marking – indeed, often an aggressive, antagonistic demarcation – of one’s territory within public space.”

 

Read the entire essay here.

 

 

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