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Edo Pop: The Graphic Impact of Japanese Prints @ Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, 27 Dec 2011
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This is a must-see if you are in the Minnesot area. The Minneapolis Institute of Arts is currently showing Edo Pop: The Graphic Impact of Japanese Prints. The exhibition features works, collectively known as ukiyo-e, or “pictures of the floating world,” produced during Japan’s Edo period (1600–1868). The exhibition also features contemporary works from artists inspired by the period, including Juxtapoz alumnist, Gajin Fujita (above).

Here is the full press release:

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts is home to about 3,000 Japanese woodblock prints. These works, collectively known as ukiyo-e, or “pictures of the floating world,” were produced during Japan’s Edo period (1600–1868). Reflecting the interests and activities of the newly emerging class of moneyed commoners, ukiyo-e prints first featured the reigning beauties of the pleasure quarters and the dashing actors of the Kabuki theater, the pop stars of the time. Later, artists expanded their repertoires to include landscapes, floral studies, legendary heroes, and even ghoulish themes.

The exhibition showcases 160 of the MIA’s best prints by the genre’s greatest artists, including Harunobu, Kiyonaga, Utamaro, Shunsh?, Sharaku, Toyokuni, Hokusai, and Hiroshige. With their crisp outlines, unmodulated colors, and surprising vantage points, the images are as fresh and captivating as when they were produced. Sensuality, fashion, decadent entertainments, and urban pastimes all reflect the popular tastes of young urban sophisticates of Japan’s pre-modern era.

In addition, the exhibition features the works of contemporary artists who are inspired by Japanese woodblock prints and the concepts underlying the floating world.

 

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Iona Rozeal Brown, 2006 (above).

Below, Katsushika Hokusai, 1760–1849, The Manor’s Dishes

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Edo Pop: The Graphic Impact of Japanese Prints
Through January 8, 2012
Minneapolis Institute of Arts


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