New Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada Mural in Bahrain

Street Art // Tuesday, May 08, 2012
Barcelona-based muralist, Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada, recently painted this temporary portrait in part of the Alwan 338 Festival in Manama, Bahrain. The artist painted the face of a local Bahraini fisherman, one of a few hundred left, in part of his identity series. The mural was painted with non-permanent materials and after the first rain it had been completely whitewashed off the wall. See the video included to watch the process.

June 2012 Juxtapoz with cover artist, Don Pendleton

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, May 08, 2012
We are pleased to announce, and show you, the cover of our June 2012 issue, featuring cover artwork from legendary skate graphic artist turned fine artist, Don Pendleton.  Also in June 2012 is former Pee-Wee's Playhouse art director Wayne White, Brooklyn's Kevin Cyr, Boston's Raul Gonzalez, Fort Thunder founder Brian Chippendale, Stockholm's spaced out Killian Eng, and the Bonnie and Clyde of graffiti, Utah and Ether.

Preview: Chrissy Angliker @ Knoerle & Baettig, Winterthur, Switzerland

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, May 08, 2012
Brooklyn-based, Zurich-born Chrissy Angliker is set to open a new series of drip paintings, Control and Chaos, at Knoerle & Baettig Gallery in Winterthur, Switzerland this Saturday, May 12. As Angliker says of the series, "The focus of this painting style lies in creating a balanced relationship between the controllable and uncontrollable. For every intentional mark, there follows a free-falling drip, challenging it. I am searching for a sense of grace in the transition between these two opposing elements."

Ofra Lapid's Broken Houses

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, May 08, 2012
Process in art has always been a discussion, whether or not its an interesting discussion is a different story. Ofra Lapid has a fascinating process behind her series Broken Houses. The series focuses on structures that have been neglected by their human counterparts and have fallen victim to weather and decay. See more after the jump...

Maurice Sendak, author of Where the Wild Things Are, RIP

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, May 08, 2012
We lost another legend this week, with the passing of Where the Wild Things Are author Maurice Sendak early this morning. He was 83. Sendak illustrated over 100 books and authored over 20 more, but it was his 1963 landmark illustrated book, Where the Wild Things Are, and his character Max, that made Sendak one of the most famed authors of children's literature ever.

Portraits of Size: Paintings by Lilli Hill (NSFW)

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, May 08, 2012
We are really trying our best to describe these paintings without being crass or offensive, because no matter what we write, somehow it will seem both crass and offensive. So we will go with the description from a website that describes the work of German artist Lilli Hill as featuring "lush females, zero gravity." That said, we are really enjoying the realistic portraits of lush females from Hill, a bit of a fresh take on the classic portrait. 

All City Canvas, Mexico City: Day 3—4

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, May 08, 2012
We were spread out this past weekend, part of us in Los Angeles, part in New York City for Frieze, and part in Mexico City, where Juxtapoz was a sponsor and lecturer at the All City Canvas Festival. We have gone over the roster, even posted about Escif's memorable mural, but a line-up of Roa, Aryz, Saner, El Mac, Herakut, Sego, Escif, Vhils, Interesni Kazki, and others is not to be missed. Here are some things we saw over the weekend...

Opening: Kehinde Wiley "An Economy of Grace" @ Sean Kelly Gallery, NYC

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, May 08, 2012
A busy weekend in NYC during the Frieze Art Fair celebration saw the opening of Kehinde Wiley's newest body of work, An Economy of Grace, at Sean Kelly Gallery. The exhibition marked a new departure from Wiley’s previous work and subject matter by depicting African-American women, his first-ever series dedicated to female subjects.

Wood Chip Sculptures by Sergey Bobkov

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, May 08, 2012
We don't think we are going out on a limb here to suggest that the work of Sergey Bobkov is just a tad creepy. His wood-chip sculptures, and yes they are very well done, seem to have a bit of a sinister look to them, perhaps because they are life-sized with intense eyes. Bobkov spent half a year to produce one eagle, working 10 to 12 hours a day, with little time off. Okay, maybe that is what is creepy...

The Work of Santiago Salvador

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, May 08, 2012
Chilean artist Santiago Salvador paints images of tiny, anonymous people often arranged in patterns reminiscent of traditional South American weaving. “I think of my paintings and drawings as constructions. I include recognizable elements in them and others that are not, creating a composition in a way loses a narrative logic, but maintains in itself a friendly and mysterious stability."

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