Takashi Murakami with Blum & Poe in Ibiza, Spain

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
As you know by now, we have had the summer of Takashi Murakami here in the Juxtapoz office. From visiting him in Tokyo, to cover story on our July issue, to special Beyond the Cover website, to our last trip to see him launch his collaboration with Vans in Paris, it's been a fun ride. In the middle of all this, Takashi opened a multi-location exhibition with Blum & Poe Gallery in Ibiza, Spain, featuring paintings and sculpture that are in and around spaces in the summer travel destination. 

Exploring Abandoned America

Photography // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
From a young age, Matthew Christopher was fascinated by abandoned architectural spaces and the effect time had on their neglected structures. After researching the decline of the state hospital system, Christopher began pursuing his passion through photography. Seeking out locations that were falling into disrepair, Christopher explored vacant churches, abandoned asylums, and burnt theaters. 

The National's Matt Berninger on "A Lot of Sorrow" Box Set and the Art of Repetition

Music // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
On May 5, 2013, Brooklyn-based rock band The National proved not only that practice and repetition makes perfect, but also makes for poignant performance art. Collaborating with Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson as part of MoMA PS1’s Sunday Sessions, the band played their three-minute and twenty-five second song “Sorrow” from their 2010 High Violet LP live on stage, repeatedly and continuously, for six hours. Not only did the tableau create a unique perspective on the concept of live performance, but it elevated the band to the fine art realm, as each note painted a veritable brushstroke that delivered contained, almost necessary improvisation. Simply, the project was called A Lot of Sorrow.

Markus Henttonen’s “Silent Night”

Photography // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
In the series “Silent Night” by Markus Henttonen, the photographer documented brightly lit houses in L.A. during Christmastime. The photographs capture a certain ominous feeling of loneliness during a time that is commercially and culturally regarded as a time of warmth and celebration. According to Henttonen, “The stories building up in viewer’s mind are the key; the houses seem like innocent Christmas decorated family houses but the feeling in the pictures is something else. It is the glamorous and bright surface that makes the inside seems and feels even darker.”

Homoerotic Works of George Quaintance published by Taschen

Erotica // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
George Quaintance was a master illustrator, and his incredible homoerotic works were created at a time when gay lifestyles were not only being repressed, but illegal in many places. Taschen books, which is one of the great publishers of erotic works, has this fantastic collection, Quaintance, which "traces his remarkable life story and reintroduces his colorful, kitschy and culturally resonant paintings—works that made George Quaintance the most popular and successful physique artist of his time, and one of its most intriguing figures."

Marco Kalach’s "Óxidos Oníricos" Show in Mexico City

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Marco Kalach’s Óxidos Oníricos is a take on the matter and the unconscious. Amongst the corroded bronze sculptures of abstract animal forms and amazingly crafted spiked figures, the oil paintings – going from figurative to abstract and jumping to geometrical representations of the city – this world that is trying to escape the artist, seems all at once chaotic and incredibly poetic. 

Elliot Schultz's Embroidered Turntable Zoetropes

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Elliot Schultz combines three old-school technologies: embroidery, turntables, and the zoetrope—a device that displays a series of pictures rapidly enough to create the illusion of motion. Original zoetropes used a tube with slits in it, through which one would watch the pictures, so his animations more closely resemble a phenakistokope, which was the original incarnation of a disk-shaped illustration-turned-animation. 

Malick Sidibé's Portraits from Mali

Photography // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Born in 1936 in Bamako, Mali, Malick Sidibé grew up farming. He studied Jewelry making, but then apprenticed in a photography studio of a French colonial. In 1962, he opened his own studio, which was a novelty in his area because it had electricity, a luxury in Bamako at the time. He's well known for his studio portraits in the 1970s as well as the candid portraits he took of young people at parties during the 1960s. 

Abstract Nudes by Waclaw Wantuch

Erotica // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Polish fine art photographer Waclaw Wantuch specializes in black and white nudes. The bodies in his work are so simpliefied in form as to appear abstract. He employs dramatic model positions, shallow depths of fields, and framing to create images of bodies that at times seem alien, or recall the decapitated torsos of greek statues. 

The New Kind of Yacht Life by Vasily Klyukin

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Thinking big has its ups and downs, but yes, the yacht game for too long has been dominated by design that was, well, yacht-like. Vasily Klyukin, a Russian businessman who seems to be very wealthy (he boasts on his site that he is "thefirst potential space tourist from Monaco"), has set his sites on making the best and most outrageous yacht designs. Take a look. We want the Swan.


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