Nicoloa Samorí's Ruined Paintings

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, August 26, 2015
We’ve posted before about Nicola Samorí. He creates Baroque-style paintings, marred and destroyed in various ways. One thick painting slides off of the wood on which it was created. Several are portraits with the subjects faces scraped or peeled away. The destruction itself is unsettling, poking at our instincts to preserve and protect art, especially art from past eras.

"Korla" Documentary Premieres in San Francisco

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, August 26, 2015
Hammond organs were big in the 50’s, and there were more than a few practitioners who smoothly played and rhythmically swayed. But not many performed the Trance Dance and wore jeweled turbans and kohl rimmed eyes. Fewer still would star in their own television show and say not a word. Korla Pandit, born John Roland Redd, a black man from Columbia, Missouri, under the tutelage of his Disney illustrator wife Beryl DeBeeson, took on the persona of East Indian swami as he embodied “divine consciousness.”

Lynn Saville's "Dark City" @ Pratt Institute's Photography Gallery, Brooklyn

Photography // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Dark City is a natural sequel to Lynn Saville's colour photographs in Night/Shift (Monacelli, 2009). Her work in that book made her, in the words of Arthur C. Danto, "the Atget of vanishing New York, prowling her city at the other end of the day, picking up pieces of the past in the present, just before it is swallowed in shadows." 

Cleon Peterson "Poison" @ Library Street Collective, Detroit

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Although a few weeks off, its never too soon to check in with past cover artist, Cleon Peterson, and his upcoming solo show at Library Street Collective in Detroit. Entitled Poison, the show sees the Cranbrook alum come back to Michigan and show a new body of work, as well as porcelain sculptures.

Eric Meola's Color-Blocked Documentary Photography

Photography // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
It’s clear Eric Meola is attracted to bright colors. His documentary photography is, at times, so focused on color and patterns that it reads at first as an abstract painting. His series have addressed subjects ranging from lights in Iceland to storms in middle America. At times he adjusts the color in his photos, changing them to match the intensity of the images in his memory.  

Tony Gleaton, Portrait Photographer Focused on Black Life, Dies at 67

Photography // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Tony Gleaton, a portrait photographer focusing on black life, died on August 15th at the age of 67. Born in Detroit, Gleaton began his photography in the late 1970s in New York fashion photography, but quit to pursue what would become a decades-long exploration of what it means to be black. He photographed African Americans in the United States, but also traveled to Central and South America and Samoa for his portraits. 

Alex Garant is the Queen of Double Eyes

Juxtapoz // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
After looking at Alex Garant’s oil paintings, portraits swirling with extra eyes and lips, we’re actually a little nauseated. The paintings are beautifully executed but give the viewer a feeling that they’re drunk or disoriented. Garant calls herself “Queen of Double Eyes,” and intends the effects as an “exorcism of the soul,” her “protagonists trying to escape themselves.” 

Japanese Artist M'onma's Trance-Created Drawings

Illustration // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
To create his dreamlike drawings, Japanese artist M’onma enters a trance, where he describes his entire body glowing and a loss of vision. He also reports an invisible presence guiding his hand. M’onma calls this state of being a “visitation,” and he began creating work in this way when he was in his ‘40s, after decades of making work he felt was unsatisfying. The drawings are surreal and use graphite, ink and colored pencil to portray meandering narratives that include religious figures, animals, spirits, and geometric play. 

Laurie Simmons' Dollers' Costume Portrait Series

Photography // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
In this striking portrait series, Laurie Simmons photographs women and men dressed up as dolls in the tradition of the Japanese subculture Kirigumi—a type of cosplay, or costume play. In these portraits, people wear latex doll masks and bodysuits, creating distinct characters.

Daniel Arzola's "No Soy Tu Chiste" Queer Activism Illustrations

Illustration // Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Venezuelan illustrator and activist Daniel Arzola has created an art campaign addressing prominent issues in the queer community such as same-sex marriage, bullying, gender fluidity, identity, and homophobia. According to Arzola, it’s the “first Venezuelan viral campaign that through art raised awareness of prejudice and violent acts performed against the LGBTI community around the world.” 
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