Organic Matters: Women to Watch 2015 @ National Museum of Women in the Arts

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 16, 2015
If Earth is our Mother, for the sake of argument, why not go to the source and delve into an encompassing exhibition, Organic Matters – Women to Watch 2015. What’s special is that the National Museum of Women in the Arts embarked on a dedicated effort to seek ascending female artists from, not only enclaves within the States, but throughout the world. Ancient musings about our romanticism and fear of nature, as well as climate change and stewardship are explored at this show in Washington, D.C.

3cm's Portraits with Body Manipulations and Modifications

Photography // Thursday, July 16, 2015
Under the name 3cm, Yung Cheng Lin, a Taiwanese photographer, focuses on portraits of women with some kind of body manipulation—either literally or through the play of imagery. Many of her portraits seem intent to disturb, piercing the body with threads, tacks or nails. They also reference some of the often hidden elements of the female body: blood and fluids. 

The Psychedelic Marbles of Mike Gong

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 16, 2015
Mike Gong hasn't lost his marbles. He's selling them. His intricate, pscychedelic designs, each a clash of bright colors, are embedded in tiny glass globes. These miniature glass art pieces range in diameter from about 13mm to 50mm, and as you turn them, the design shifts. They feature both abstract patterns and, in his Acid Eaters collection, the more direct: monstrous faces holding tabs of acid on their tongues. 

Carlos Santos' Anatomical Distortions

Juxtapoz // Thursday, July 16, 2015
Think about the human body; the veins, the bones, the blood, the way everything is connected. Think about the way it’s structured and then, toss this idea aside.  What is left without this is a continuum of forms without limitations, a mere idea of the way everything circulates within us. This is what Mexican artist Carlos Santos gives to his spectator. 

Vans Syndicate x Mister Cartoon

Fashion // Thursday, July 16, 2015
As part of the 10th anniversary of the Vans Syndicate collection, Vans Pro Skate collaborated with former Juxtapoz cover artist and renowned tattoo and graffiti artist Mister Cartoon on an inagural Syndicate collection. 

Juxtapoz Presents: Tom Killion's Woodcut Printmaking

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Northern California is home to some of the world’s most gorgeous landscapes. From the Sierra to the Ocean, to mountains that touch the Pacific, the ethereal beauty is a work of art itself. For over 40 years, Tom Killion has delicately archived the environmental majesty of California within the traditional process of Japanese-Style woodblock printmaking, creating stunning, colorful works through a handmade, ancient operation. We visited Tom at his Point Reyes studio to experience the comfort of a beginner’s state of mind.

Takashi Murakami with Blum & Poe in Ibiza, Spain

Juxtapoz // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
As you know by now, we have had the summer of Takashi Murakami here in the Juxtapoz office. From visiting him in Tokyo, to cover story on our July issue, to special Beyond the Cover website, to our last trip to see him launch his collaboration with Vans in Paris, it's been a fun ride. In the middle of all this, Takashi opened a multi-location exhibition with Blum & Poe Gallery in Ibiza, Spain, featuring paintings and sculpture that are in and around spaces in the summer travel destination. 

Exploring Abandoned America

Photography // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
From a young age, Matthew Christopher was fascinated by abandoned architectural spaces and the effect time had on their neglected structures. After researching the decline of the state hospital system, Christopher began pursuing his passion through photography. Seeking out locations that were falling into disrepair, Christopher explored vacant churches, abandoned asylums, and burnt theaters. 

The National's Matt Berninger on "A Lot of Sorrow" Box Set and the Art of Repetition

Music // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
On May 5, 2013, Brooklyn-based rock band The National proved not only that practice and repetition makes perfect, but also makes for poignant performance art. Collaborating with Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson as part of MoMA PS1’s Sunday Sessions, the band played their three-minute and twenty-five second song “Sorrow” from their 2010 High Violet LP live on stage, repeatedly and continuously, for six hours. Not only did the tableau create a unique perspective on the concept of live performance, but it elevated the band to the fine art realm, as each note painted a veritable brushstroke that delivered contained, almost necessary improvisation. Simply, the project was called A Lot of Sorrow.

Markus Henttonen’s “Silent Night”

Photography // Wednesday, July 15, 2015
In the series “Silent Night” by Markus Henttonen, the photographer documented brightly lit houses in L.A. during Christmastime. The photographs capture a certain ominous feeling of loneliness during a time that is commercially and culturally regarded as a time of warmth and celebration. According to Henttonen, “The stories building up in viewer’s mind are the key; the houses seem like innocent Christmas decorated family houses but the feeling in the pictures is something else. It is the glamorous and bright surface that makes the inside seems and feels even darker.”

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