Installations by Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B. Nguyen

Juxtapoz // Monday, July 01, 2013
Using wood and paper, Brooklyn-based long time collaborators Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B. Nguyen create large-scale installations that often resemble trees and forests, filling entire rooms with the twisted and crushed materials. 

Bonsai Treehouses and other Sculptures by Takanori Aiba

Juxtapoz // Monday, July 01, 2013
We like tree houses and we like Bonsai. Naturally, we love Bonsai tree houses. We are also down with Michelin man hotels. Japanese artist Takanori Aiba uses stone clay, epoxy putty, copper line, plastic, and resin among other things to construct these fantastic pieces. Aiba's background includes being an art director for architectural spaces and a maze illustrator. The sketches for the sculptures are also wonderful.

Firework Drawings by Rosemarie Fiore

Juxtapoz // Monday, July 01, 2013
Bronx-based Rosemarie Fiore uses everything from lawn mowers, cars, waffle irons, floor polishers, pinball machines, and yes, fireworks to create her colorful works of art. Her "Pyrotechnics" series was created by exploding fireworks (under cardboard cylinders and metal cans) over paper!

The Work of Laurence Demaison

Juxtapoz // Monday, July 01, 2013
French photographer Laurence Demaison sometimes combines black and white photos with her own drawing, generating a ghostly finished product. "Taking full advantage of shwoing what the camera sees (sometimes over long periods of exposure) compared to what the human eye cannont or does not see, she pre-visualizes each photograph up to a certain degree, and then lets chance and intuitive performance intervene."

"Sacred Ink" Photographs by Cedric Arnlod

Juxtapoz // Monday, July 01, 2013
While working in Bangkok on assignment, British/French photographer Cedric Arnold met a shipyard worker who was covered head-to-toe in tattoos. The tradition, chronicled in a project that consumed four and half years of his life, attempts to cover the tradition in its entirety by documenting ceremonies that are only held in certain parts of the country. The tradition incorporates elements of Buddhism, Animism, Brahmanism, and Hinduism and is believed to date back to the 9th century. 

Grayson Perry's Tapestries

Juxtapoz // Monday, July 01, 2013
This morning we take a look at Grayson Perry's series of tapestries entitled "The Vanity of Small Differences." The series is beginning a tour in Sunderland, England. Perry is the winner of the 2003 Turner Prize and uses ceramics and other art forms to comment on societal injustices and hypocrisies through a "variety of historical and contemporary themes."

The work of G loois

Street Art // Sunday, June 30, 2013
G Loois is an artist from Bologna who creates highly abstract minimalist work predominantly in monochrome. Check out a selection of his work on walls.

Music Video: Nine Inch Nails "Came Back Haunted" directed by David Lynch

Music // Sunday, June 30, 2013
By the way, we are again curating the art portion of the annual Outside Lands Music and Art Festival in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park this summer. We bring this up now because Nine Inch Nails, the comeback version, will be headlining one of the nights. So without further ado, we want to show you the new music video by NIN, "Came Back Haunted," directed by the legendary and consistently interesting and progressive David Lynch. This video could cause a seizure, dance party, industrial hangout session, or just plain listening pleasure. Trent Reznor never looked so blurry. 

Atelier Ace + Hotel "Thinking Cap" Series with Evan B. Harris

Juxtapoz // Sunday, June 30, 2013
From our good friends at the Ace Hotel: "Thinking Cap is an evolving series of inquiries into the creative processes of experimental artists, musicians and personalities. It's an open-ended journey through the circuitry of the inspired." And to kick start the Thinking Cap series, they document illustrator Evan B Harris, who painted one of the first murals at the Ace Hotel Portland property.

James Turrell "Aten Reign" @ Guggenheim, NYC

Juxtapoz // Saturday, June 29, 2013
James Turrell’s first exhibition in a New York museum since 1980 focuses on the artist’s groundbreaking explorations of perception, light, color, and space, with a special focus on the role of site-specificity in his practice. At its core is Aten Reign (2013), a major new project that recasts the Guggenheim rotunda as an enormous volume filled with shifting artificial and natural light.

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